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Feed Your Gut With Prebiotics

Probiotics and Prebiotics, A perfect Combination for Good Gut Health

By now just about everyone knows that probiotics are good for your gut health. Having a strong immune system and good digestion is dependent upon having a large number of good, beneficial bacteria in your gut. But did you know that Prebiotics are beneficial for your gut?

Prebiotics are the easiest way to Feed the good Gut Bacteria.

That’s right, you need to take care of the good bacteria is by making sure they are well fed.

How do you Feed The Good Bacteria in Your Gut?

Prebiotic Fiber are a type of fiber called oligosaccharides. These oligosaccharides are found in foods like jerusalem artichoke, dandelion greens, onions and jicama.

You are supposed to get at least 25 grams of fiber every day.

Prebiotic fiber is necessary to feed the good gut bacteria.

What are the Foods which Contain Prebiotic Soluble Fiber?

  • Raw Dandelion Greens
  • Jerusalem Artichokes
  • Raw asparagus
  • Leeks, Onions & Garlic

Click here to Read the top 5 Reasons you Should Be Taking Prebiotics.

While probiotic foods are essential for gut health and overall well-being, prebiotics help “feed” probiotics. By pairing these two together, you can achieve an even better result.

Sometimes it may hard to get Prebiotic Fiber in our normal daily diet and it’s necessary to supplement with prebiotics.

Perfect Pass Prebiotics are made from partially hydrolyzed guar gum, known as PHGG. This type of prebiotic is called a galactomannan. Hydrolyzed Guar Gum doesn’t cause any side effects that can be commonly associated with prebiotics.

If you are looking for a prebiotic derived from PHGG try taking Perfect Pass Prebiotic.

Perfect Pass Prebiotics is one of the only prebiotics that can be safely used by people who have SIBO (Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth). It is the perfect fertilizer for your good bacteria to grow.

If you haven’t used Perfect Pass Probiotic yet, now is the time to try it. Pair it wth any probiotics you are taking to grow the numbers of good bacteria in your gut and increase their efficacy.

Click Here to read about how  PHGG helps those with Irritable Bowel Syndrome, increases the concentration of good bacteria strains in the colon and helps reduce symptoms of acute diarrhea.

Check out a Natural Approach to Colitis Relief

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disorder that affects the large bowel or the colon. This disorder is the inflammation of the colon, which is responsible for gathering and storing excess waste from digestion. If you have colitis and want to treat it naturally, there are many options available to you.

Various circumstances may cause inflammation of the colon and result in colitis, such as an autoimmune disease, infection or an overgrowth of bad bacteria. The symptoms of colitis are typically sporadic and come and go with fairly long periods in-between flare-ups. Some patients will have no symptoms in between these periods of flare-ups.

What are the Symptoms of Colitis?

The first symptom of ulcerative colitis is a progressive loosening of the stool. The stool is generally bloody and may be associated with cramping, abdominal pain and severe urgency to use the bathroom. The diarrhea may begin slowly or quite suddenly.

Other symptoms are loss of appetite, weight loss and fatigue. In addition, there may be skin lesions, joint pain, eye inflammation, and liver disorders.

When young children have Ulcerative Colitis they may fail to develop or grow properly.

Approximately half of all patients with Ulcerative Colitis have mild symptoms. However, others may suffer with more severe symptoms such as abdominal cramping, bloody diarrhea, nausea, and fever.

There are supplements that help with colitis like prebiotics and probiotics. Many of those suffering with Colitis have found that changing their diets has a significant impact on their symptoms  and flare-ups. Other people opt for natural treatments that compliment their treatment protocol described by their doctors.

Depending on how you manage your diet, the symptoms can range from intense to remission.

What Are Natural Ways You Can Manage Colitis?

Cutting down on refined carbohydrates. These are foods made with white flour and sugar. For recipe ideas check out  the The Specific Carbohydrate Diet Cookbook by Raman Prasad.

Avoiding foods that trigger an allergic response. Keep a food journal to write down what you are eating. Foods which typically are not agreeable for Colitis sufferers are wheat, gluten, soy, dairy, eggs and GMO corn.

Eat a diet rich in prebiotic. Prebiotics grow the good bacteria in your gut. Try adding Jerusalem artichokes, dandelion greens, garlic, onion, leeks and asparagus to your meals. If you want additional fiber you can easily supplement with Perfect Pass Prebiotic. Just add a scoop to water, juice or a smoothie daily.

Cut down on sugar or eliminate it completely. Supplement with honey, stevia, brown rice syrup, coconut sugar, or xylitol.

Add a spore based probiotic to your daily routine. The imbalance of bacteria is thought to be a potential cause of Ulcerative Colitis. We recommend taking 2 capsules daily of Perfect Pass Probiotic to add in more good bacteria which crowds out the bad bacteria. Several studies have shown that probiotics help reduce the symptoms during flareups.

If your symptoms become severe, it is important for you to seek medical help. Persistent diarrhea, feelings of weakness, dehydration, and fever can all indicate serious concerns and you will want to be under a doctors care.

Not on Top of Your Game? It Could Be Microbiome Dysbiosis

Natural Pharmacist Ross Pelton

Ross Pelton,  The Natural Pharmacist talks with us about the Microbiome, dysbiosis and pathobiome. Click Here to see his interview.

Our gut microbiome is made up of over 100 trillion organisms, it’s a delicate balance which is made up of both good and bad bacteria. Hopefully more good.

What is Dysbiosis?

 Essentially it’s when your good gut bacteria is out of balance with your bad gut bacteria. When the good outweighs the bad you have dysbiosis. Ross calls Microbiome dysbiosis the ‘pathobiome’.

When you have dysbiosis or a ‘pathobiome’ you will experience symptoms.

What are the pathobiome Symptoms?

  • gas
  • bloating
  • diarrhea
  • constipation

When you have these symptoms it’s important not to ignore them.

These symptoms are your bodies warning signs.

Think of them as red flags that something is wrong.

What does a pathobiome lead to?

  • gastrointestinal disorders like IBS, Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis
  • extraintestinal disorders such as asthma, allergies, heart disease and obesity
  • mood disorders such as depression and anxiety

ADResearch compiled by the US National Library of Medicine from over 90 different studies in the last 10 years states that, “there is growing evidence that dysbiosis of the gut microbiota is associated with the pathogenesis of both intestinal and extra-intestinal disorders.”

Why do people get an upset microbiome?

  • Antibiotics are the #1 reason; antibiotics kill all the good bacteria.
  • Acid suppressing drugs; too low levels of acidity encourage the growth of bad bacteria
  • Steroid drugs
  • Birth control
  • Chemotherapy
  • Diet consisting of processed food and high in carbohydrates.
  • Pesticides in agricultural food supply
  • Environmental toxins: mercury, lead and arsenic
  • Chlorinated water which kills bacteria; good and bad
  • Not feeding your probiotics; you need to fertilize the good bacteria with prebiotic foods or a prebiotic supplement

“Remember every time you eat you are feeding 100 trillion guests.” thats good advice from Ross Pelton.

The Natural Pharmacist, Ross PeltonStay tuned for part 3 of our talk with Ross Pelton on Gut Health coming in two weeks.

Ross Pelton is a pharmacist and a true expert on pharmaceutical drugs and their life-altering side effects. He is also a clinical nutritionist and helps people with diet, nutrition and natural therapies.

He truly is an expert in helping his clients integrate the best of both worlds to improve their health.

Check him out on Facebook, The Natural Pharmacist.

Why Human Strain Probiotics?

How to Choose the Right Probiotic

There are so many probiotic products on the market today that knowing how to choose one can be a true task. It can also be intimidating.

First of all, quality is key. It is important to know that the company who makes the product is reputable, and their product has been well researched.

Colony forming units (CFU’s), are the number of bacteria in the product. Our bodies naturally have about 100 trillion bacteria at any one time. It is commonly advised to have a minimum of 40 billion CFU’s in a probiotic formula, although more is not always better.

This varies with age, and need.

In order to get what you need, there are different products whose bacteria act differently due to the strains used, or the process used to create them. Multiple strains are very important as each bacterium has a different job.

One way to go is with human strain probiotics. These are comprised of human sourced microflora which are able to survive the high acid content in the stomach, and remain there to colonize and do their job of increasing the good bacteria.

One product containing human strains is known as Perfect Pass Probiotic. Perfect Pass Probiotic contains three essential ingredients that are among the most researched and beneficial. These strains are:

  •  Bacillus Coagulans: known for reducing inflammation and increasing good bacteria in the gut.
  •  Bacillus Subtilis HU58: stimulates the immune system and is known as a strong deterrent of bad bacteria.
  •  Bacillus Clausii: very commonly used in many products. It is known to be very beneficial in post-antibiotic treatment to rebuild the good bacteria.

Prebiotics

Prebiotics are also of great importance. They feed the good bacteria and help it to grow. Some products come all in one and others are sold separately. Perfect Pass Prebiotic is the right food for the bacterial strains in the Perfect Pass Probiotic formula. It is a well-studied soluble fiber.

Probiotics of choice should have no added fillers, be non-GMO, and gluten free.

For constant valuable information follow Karen on Facebook!

Karen’s March blog posts include:
Protection From Toxic Exposure Including Anesthesia
Studies on Toxins Found in Vaccinations and Solutions Regarding Exemption and Injury
Candida Questions-Sugars and More Ways to Test     

http://naturallyhealingautism.com

Prebiotics and Butyrate

Prebiotics and  Butyrate What’s the Connection?

Prebiotics and Butyrate diagram

We used to think that the total surface of our digestive tract was about the size of a tennis court. Now, we know better …that’s been corrected. NIH study shows it to be the size of half a badminton court. With that said, it’s curious to note that there’s only one single layer of cells that separates our gut from the rest of our bodily function.

It’s very important to realize that the primary constituents that keep this very important cell layer alive are known as a short-chain fatty acid by the name of butyrate.

Butyrate is what our beneficial flora makes from the soluble fiber we take in.

So what happens, in essence, is that we feed the beneficial flora in our gut, and then the beneficial bacteria, in turn, help to feed us by keeping our digestive tract healthy.

Our good gut bacteria thrive on the soluble fiber or prebiotics that we ingest and the good bacteria provide the vital energy source for the cells that line our gut.

Now, what about bad bacteria?

We have to address the issue that there are bad bacteria all around as well. The more they proliferate, the sicker we become. The challenge we face it to consistently keep lots of the good bacteria around but at the same time get rid of the bad or pathogenic bacteria

The way our good flora tell our immune system that they’re helpful and beneficial bacteria, and not bad bacteria, is by butyrate signals. Clinical rsearch has shown us how butyrate is able to suppresses inflammatory reaction and how butyrate instructs our immune system to calms down.

When butyrate levels are low, our immune system doesn’t know this and is therefore unable to stop their attack on bacteria.

When we don’t fuel the growth of good bacteria with enough fiber, we don’t produce enough butyrate. Hypothetically, we could have lots of good bacteria, however, if we fail to feed them with fiber, they don’t make butyrate.

Unfortunately when our body senses low levels of butyrate, it mistakenly thinks that our gut is filled with bad bacteria and responds accordingly. What happens is that our human body may mistake low fiber intake for having a population of bad bacteria in our gut.

In reality, our human body has evolved over millions of years, all the time getting massive fiber intake. Our body doesn’t recognize modern day, processed foods which sorely lack soluble fiber, the very fuel needed for butyrate production.

For all this time, low butyrate has implied bad bacteria, so that’s the reason our body goes into an inflammatory offensive response.

You can prevent this from happening by making sure that you take an excellent source of prebiotic soluble fiber on a daily basis. It’s critical for butyrate production to support optimal health.

Butyrate: Feeding the Gut and Beyond for Animal Health

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