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Do You Have Leaky Gut? Find Out

What is Leaky Gut?

In a nut shell it’s intestinal permeability. People with leaky gut experience symptoms within a short time after eating.  Symptoms like stomach upset, gas, bloating and fatigue.

How Does Leaky Gut Happen?

Leaky gut occurs when your gut lining breaks down. This allows proteins, gluten, undigested foods and even bad bacteria to leak into your bloodstream.

What happens next?

Your body creates an immune response; this response is what causes you to feel ill after you eat and lethargic.

Leaky gut left over time causes your body to be in a constant state of inflammation.  Left untreated this inflammation contributes to chronic illness such as cardiovascular disease, cancer,  auto-immune disorders, mood disorders, Irritable Bowel Syndrome and allergies.

What Causes Leaky Gut?

Leaky Gut can be caused by any of number of things. Here’s the most common:

  • poor diet
  • alcohol
  • stress
  • antibiotics
  • intestinal bugs
  • sugar

What’s the Solution?

First and foremost, find out about your gut health.  If you think you may  have Leaky Gut; take the at home Genova Lab Intestinal Permeability urine test. If you do have Leaky Gut start by repairing the gut.

Leaky Gut Formula has been shown to be extremely helpful in repairing the gut lining. Also, consider Intestinal Repair Capsules.

Crowd out the bad bacteria with good bacteria. Start taking a Probiotic and a Prebiotic. Leaky Gut responds extremely well to the combination of PerfectPass Prebiotic and PerfectPass Probiotic. Together they increase your good bacteria diversity as well as help to eliminate bad bacteria.

Give your digestive tract a break so it can focus on repair by using digestive enzymes; Perfect Pass Digestive Enzymes help digest  food when taken with meals and will reduce inflammation when taken between meals.

Now, take a look at your diet choices.

A very close look.

Are you eating refined carbohydrates, processed convenience foods or foods with hidden sugars.

With a Leaky Gut, these foods will continue to wreak havoc on your system and you will have a tough time healing.

Check out this book by Elaine Gottschall; Breaking the Vicious Cycle. This is an excellent resource for recipes and tips on how to reduce inflammation and heal your gut through foods.

In the meantime for more information on Leaky Gut, watch this short video of Microbiologist Kiran Krishnan. Kiran explains how they  performed a clinical trial measuring the toxic response of persons with Leaky Gut Syndrome before and after taking a 60 day course of probiotics. The trial participants were cured of their intestinal permeability after the 60 days! The spores of probiotics are the same soil based spores that you can find in Perfect Pass Probiotics.

Pamela Nathan Gut Health Series Interview

Pamela Nathan’s Interview with Leah Kline

I recently participated in Leah Kline’s Gut Health Symposium. What a great panel of speakers she interviewed. There was so much to be learned from so many different experts talking about many different aspects of gut health. Not only was the information invaluable but there were lots of free giveaways as well.

Leah was curious to hear about how I was introduced to holistic medicine. Then she went on to ask me about my current ‘pet’ topics, like, how our understanding of what probiotics really are has changed since the completion of the Human Microbiome Project, as well as why I think prebiotics are so important with today’s challenges in maintaining excellent gut function.

Here’s the interview in case you missed it.

What are Synbiotics?

Dr. Robynne ChutkanDr. Robynne Chutkan, an integrative gastroenterologist and best selling author of the “Microbiome Solution” was interviewed by Dr. Oz recently. She was talking about Irritable Bowel Syndrome, explaining how IBS can manifest both as IBS-C (with constipation) and IBS-D (with diarrhea). She went on to suggest than an excellent way to help both kinds of IBS is with synbiotics …. and tells you how to make your own at home.

What’s a Synbiotic?

Synbiotics are the dynamo combination of prebiotics and probiotics. Not only do they provide good food for gut bacteria but they also deliver significant amounts of live bacteria themselves. The probiotics are good, live bacteria for our gut while the prebiotics are the food for our beneficial gastro intestinal bacteria. She recommends synbiotics for both IBS-C and IBS-D.

How to make Synbiotics at Home

Dr. Chutkan explains how to transform your prebiotic foods into synbiotics at home. You start off by taking any prebiotic veggie and adding a teaspoon of salt. That’s it! So, chop up some carrots, asparagus, and onions and place then place them in a mason jar and cover them in water. Then add a teaspoon of salt and cover the jar with a paper towel and rubber band. Then let it sit on your counter for a week. They’ll keep for one month in your fridge. What happens is that all the good bacteria start to grow and turn your prebiotics into a synbiotic. It’s that easy to do at home!

What Happens when you don’t have time to make Synbiotics at Home?

Committing to eat fermented foods on a consistent basis may be difficult to achieve. Actually making synbiotics may be a challenge as well. That’s where our Perfect Pass Prebiotic and Probiotic Combination comes to the rescue. In reviewing many of our past blog posts, you’ll find that our philosophy on how to maintain a healthy gut synchronizes precisely with Dr Chutkan’s approach. We, too, encourage our clients to use a combination of prebiotics with probiotics, even when they don’t actually make the synbiotics at home, they create a similar environment in the gut by combining both pre and probiotics.

You need good gut bacteria, and lots of it to make a healthy microbiome. You know how important your gut bacteria is. You need to nurture it. You know, too, that a strong microbiome is constantly compromised by antibiotics, processed foods and environmental toxins. The bests way to nurture your microbiome is by feeding it. This will help increase the numbers. Yes, that’s right, you can feed your bacteria. This helps your microbiome grow strong and encourages the good bacteria to multiply. How do we do this? …by actually feeding it with prebiotics. Not all Prebiotics are the same There’s a difference between different types of prebiotics – like Inulin, FOS and PHGG. Inulin-type prebiotics include fructooligosaccharides (FOS), oligofructose, and inulin. Whereas PHGG is a galactooligosaccharides.

The preferred prebiotic type is galactooligosaccharides. Why? because they ferment slowly. When the soluble fiber ferments slowly, it doesn’t result in symptoms of gas and bloating which often happens with inulin and FOS which are known to cause digestive symptoms like gas and bloating as a result of their rapid speed of fermentation. That’s why our Perfect Pass Prebiotic PHGG is a pure galactooligosacaride – one that is known to ferment slowly and not cause any side effects. What’s more …. there’s valid clinical research to show how beneficial it is in combating SIBO as well as reducing symptoms of both diarrhea and constipation.

Why choose PHGG?

We prefer the prebiotic that is made from partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG). The process of hydrolyzation slows down the fermentation process to insure the likelihood that your good bacteria has time to feed on it. The guar gum is already partially broken down with water. Guar gum that is used in Perfect Pass Prebiotic is highly purified and extensively researched. It dissolves easily and fully in water and it’s easy for everyone to use. There’s no smell, no taste and it breaks down easily.

Good Gut Solution Special Prebiotic Offer

Based on our confidence on how effective the synbiotic concept is, we encourage all our clients to consider using our PHGG prebiotic  with any probiotic of their choice. Right now when you buy Perfect Pass Prebiotic with any of these probiotics, you receive 10% off the probiotics. You can choose from Dr. Ohhira, VSL, Visbiome or Primal Defense. No coupon is needed, simply place both in your cart to receive the discount. Better still, when you purchase Perfect Pass Prebiotic with Perfect Pass Probiotic, our favored probiotic, you’ll get 15% off the probiotics. No coupon is needed, simply put both in your cart to receive the discount.

This Life Changing Product Can Make Your Probiotics Stronger

I’m talking about Prebiotics…what are prebiotics you may ask?

Most of us health minded people know how important our gut health is and the critical role which a strong microbiome plays in good gut health. Since the Human Microbiome Project Research we learned that taking in probiotics is temporary help. Most probiotics have a transient effect, encouraging a positive immune response. However, they don’t actually grow.

When it comes to encouraging long term beneficial effects for our microbiome, we want to make sure we are giving our microbes the best chance for growth and diversification.

That’s where prebiotics come in. Not only are people starting to talk about them, but they are starting to use them. Clinical researchers are using them in trials and publishing the findings supporting the efficacy of certain types of prebiotics.  

Research shows that we are able to help our gut flora flourish, with long term as well as short term benefits. They are able to relieve IBS symptoms such as constipation and diarrhea.  This research has physicians, scientists, dietitians and practitioners excited about it’s role in keeping our Microbiome in good shape.  

What is the Difference Between Prebiotics and Probiotics?

Prebiotics are the relatively unknown. Yet, most people know about probiotics. Basically, a prebiotic is soluble fiber. The fiber is found in some common foods like chicory, garlic, and Jerusalem artichokes. This fiber feeds good bacteria and help them to flourish.

Probiotics are good bacteria. Generally speaking there are several strains that are included in each formula. When we take probiotics, we’re giving our gut more good bacteria. They are able to alleviate many digestive symptoms. Unfortunately, the relief may be temporary. The only probiotics that actually grow are those that are human strain because they are recognized by our human microbiome.

Prebiotics, on the other hand, are not bacteria, but “food for your existing good bacteria.”

Here’s Why Prebiotics Are So Powerful

Good bacteria in our gut multiplies as a result of ‘feeding’ on this specific type of soluble fiber. That means, when we take prebiotics, we selectively help good bacteria in our gut to thrive and grow. This also helps to crowd out bad bacteria. 

Why Are Prebiotics So Critical?

We now have a completely new understanding of how our 100 trillion gut bacteria contribute to emotional health, physical health and disease with the completion of the massive scientific undertaking called the ‘Human Microbiome Project’. The study provided quite a shock to the community at large.

There has been more research on the human microbiota in the past 8 years than in the prior 50 years. It’s an exciting time. This research has given us a completely new understanding of how our gut bacteria contributes to our physical health, mental health and disease.

Now we know that prebiotics act as fertilizer for our Human Microbiome. They are able to make their way through the stomach without being affected by acid or bile. They bring about positive changes in the digestive tract as they are the fuel for beneficial bacteria that live in our gut to thrive on.

Did you know that your gut houses between 500 and 1000 different species of microorganisms? 

It turns out, it’s not a few species of bacteria that makes us healthier. It’s having many different species cooperating together that makes for a healthy microbiome. In other words, the more diversity of good bacteria we have, the healthier we are.

What types of positive change can taking Prebiotics bring about?

  • lower risk for cardiovascular disease

  • healthier cholesterol levels

  • better gut health

  • improved digestion

  • lower stress response

  • better hormonal balance

  • higher immune function

  • lower risk for obesity and weight gain

Yes, prebiotics work together with probiotics to encourage more significant changes to take place in the gastrointestinal system. They play a huge role in maintaining the balance and diversity of intestinal bacteria. They essentially increase the numbers of good bacteria which crowds out the bad bacteria.

Prebiotics ferment when they are ingested and that’s what the good bacteria in our gut feed on. This includes the microorganisms we already have in our gut as well as the new ones we introduce through supplementation or by including fermented foods in our diet. By feeding these microbes we increase the diversity and numbers in our gut.

How do Prebiotics help heal the Gut?

Once the good bacteria is increased and the bad bacteria is reduced in numbers, it encourages the correct ratio of good to bad bacteria, promoting an ideal environment for our gut to heal.

An inflamed gut or a leaky gut is a condition which may lead to IBS, Colitis or Crohns. If we can increase the health of our microbiome when we start to have digestive symptoms, we may be able to avoid these conditions completely.

Yes, you can heal an inflamed and damaged gut by feeding your microbiome and creating diversity. 

What Are the Most Effective Prebiotics?

Historically, there have been several symbiotic formulas that included prebiotics called Inulin and FOS with probiotics. Unfortunately, these prebiotics are known to cause digestive symptoms like gas and bloating as a result of their rapid speed of fermentation.

This is the reason we prefer the prebiotic that is made from partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG). The process of hydrolyzation is very significant because it makes it far easier for your good bacteria to feed on it as the guar gum is already partially broken down with water.

The guar gum that is used is highly purified and extensively researched. It dissolves easily and fully in water and it’s easy for consumers to use.There’s no smell and no taste. Due to it’s ability to break down easily, as well as it’s slow fermentation time, it’s more effective than using inulin and FOS. PHGG doesn’t create the side effects associated with them.

In August 2016 the FDA confirmed that the guar gum ingredient contained in Perfect Pass Prebiotic is within their standard that acknowledges that it provides health benefits. The FDA singled out five types of isolated fibers that they believe have the clinical evidence for physiological benefit to back a dietary fiber type of claim. The 5 that met their standard were guar gum, locust bean gum, pectin, cellulose, and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose  

What’s the Latest Research on PHGG – Partially Hydrolyzed Guar Gum?

Studies on the beneficial use of PHGG continues to be published world wide:

Bloating and Gas in IBS Patients
A randomized clinical study was published in ‘Nutrition and Metabolism’ on February 6, 2016 that was conducted by Niv, E et al. Suitable IBS patients were involved in an 18-week-long study. They were given 12-weeks of PHGG which resulted in a significant improvement in bloating and gas. What was really significant is that the effect lasted for at least 4 weeks after the last PHGG was given.
These IBS patients were given 6 g/day of PHGG

Constipation
In March 2015, Russo L et al ‘s research on IBS patients with constipation was published in Gastroenterology  Sixty-eight patients with IBS entered a 2-week run-in period, followed by a 4-week study period with PHGG.  These patients had a significant improvement in constipation symptoms.

Pediatric Abdominal Pain
Ramano et al published their research in the World Journal of Gastroenterology in 2013. It was a randomized, double-blind pilot study that included sixty children (8-16 years) with functional bowel disorders, such as Chronic Abdominal Pain or IBS. All patients underwent ultrasound, blood and stool examinations to rule out any organic disease. The findings in this study show that PHGG fiber supplementation can be considered an important therapeutic option in pediatric IBS.

SIBO Small Intestine Bacteria Overgrowth
Furnari M, et al conducted a study on patients with SIBO. Where as several prebiotics have been contraindicated for people suffering with small intestine bacteria overgrowth, PHGG is perfectly safe and in fact, beneficial. The clinical trial published in Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics in 2010 showed that the combination of rifaximin with PHGG partially hydrolysed guar gum is more effective than rifaximin alone in eradicating small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

SIBO Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth

What is SIBO? What can I do about SIBO?

SIBO causes digestive discomfortSIBO is actually an acronym for a digestive condition called  “small intestinal bacterial overgrowth,” which points to excessive bad or pathogenic bacteria in the small intestine.

Even though bacteria occurs naturally everywhere in a healthy digestive system, the small intestine is known to have relatively low levels of bacteria. The highest numbers of bacteria are usually found in the large intestine

The small intestine where the food mixes with digestive juices, and the nutrients from our food is absorbed into the bloodstream. This area of our digestive tract is the longest section. If a person suffers with SIBO or Small Intestine Bacterial Ovegrowth, nutrients are not absorbed properly causing malabsorption. This relates especially to iron as well as fat-soluble vitamins. Other symptoms, often present as well, are gas, bloating and even pain. This is often the case in people suffering with symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Small Intestinel Bacterial Overgrowth is very often treated with antibiotics. Unfortunately, although antibiotics reduce the bad bacteria overgrowth, it also kills off the good bacteria at the same time, which, in turn, depletes the necessary good bacteria.

In fact, a study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, showed that people with SIBO who were given antibiotics had a high recurrence rate and also that their gut-related symptoms increased during the recurrences.

Fortunately, a research study on herbal remedies have been found effective in treating SIBO as well. These include Oregano oil and Berberis that are mentioned in the study.

Taking a prebiotic that is known not to feed bad bacteria as well as a human strain probiotic has been shown to be extremely beneficial. Dr Jonathan Axe sites a pilot study from researchers at the Center for Medical Education and Clinical Research in Buenos Aires, Argentina, who found that probiotics have a higher efficacy rate than metronidazole for individuals with SIBO.

Dietary modification is extremely important. Follow the specific carbohydrate diet, or consider the FODMAPS or GAPS diet. Eat every 2 hours so you digest your food quickly and don’t have a lot of food sitting in your stomach at any one time resulting in damage to gastric juices. Low stomach acid is one of the main factors that result in SIBO because stomach acid kills bacteria in your upper Gastrointestinal tract.

SIBO Recommendations:

1. Genova Lab’s Breath Test (GSD5000) done at home, successfully identifies whether there is an overgrowth of bad bacteria in the small intestine or not. Once identified, take the necessary steps to resolve it.

2. Several supplements help reduce symptoms of SIBO.

  • Unlike Inulin and FOS, Partially Hydrolyzed Guar Gum PHGG is the one prebiotic that does not feed bad bacteria and may be used successfully to increase probiotic diversity. PerfectPass Prebiotic (PSN1000) is odorless and tasteless and easy to take in water.
  • PerfectPass Probotic (PSN2000) is a human strain, bacillus formula, that does survive through the stomach acid 100% of the time. It is suitable for those suffering with SIB0
  • Effective antimicrobials include Oregano oil (NHS1000), Grapeseed extract (CVR0621), Olive leaf extract (OLE1000) and Berberis (VTN2541).
  • Consider taking Proteolytic Enzymes on a regular basis in between your meals. They help repair the gut lining  (DWL1400).3 Dietary Changes

    3 D ietary changes

  • The SCD Specific Carbohydrate Diet is an excellent way to eliminate those foods that tend to feed the bad bacteria. Breaking the Vicious Cycle (GOT1000) by Elaine Gottschall will give you information as well as recipes.

  • Other diets to consider are
    FODMAPS and
    GAPS

Copyright © 2017 Good Gut Solution.

Sheryl Cohen December 28, 2016