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uBiome-The Key to What Microbes Live in My Gut.

Follow me on my quest to get to the bottom of what bacteria live in my gut.

I’ve read for a long time that everyone should be taking probiotics,  Honestly though, I rarely have any digestion issues, stomach upset, irregular bowel movements or even bloating or gas. At times I think maybe I have a stomach of steel. It could be because I eat a very healthy diet and incorporate a lot of foods with naturally occurring probiotics in them on a regular basis. I’m not sure what resides in my gut. Is it good bacteria, bad bacteria or a mix of the two.

One thing is that I regularly consume fermented foods; kimchi, krauts, pickled products and fermented yogurt products. In fact, there are even times where I eat kimchi and sour kraut for breakfast on top of my eggs.

Probiotics are for people who have chronic gut conditions and weakened immune systems, I thought.

Then I started reading up on probiotics and the gut and realized the havoc that goes on when you take antibiotics. I knew about this. I definitely accepted the idea that everyone should take a round of probiotics once they finish their course of antibiotics. I even did the same thing for my two dogs whenever they finished a round of antibiotics for their chronic ear infections.

So, when I had to go on antibiotics last spring for a root canal I was ready. I loaded up on the probiotics during and after my procedure and felt I’d done my part.

Or, so I thought. I have to admit I did wonder if I had replaced all my gut bacteria which was wiped out by taking probiotics for a few weeks and eating raw goat yogurt.

Is all the fermented food really doing it’s job by bringing in hundreds of strains of bacteria? How will I really know?

uBiome Gut TestThen I heard about uBiome. It’s a way to check out these microbes in your gut. This test actually does a DNA sequencing of your microbes.

It names the microbes and tells you how many you have of each strain. That was exciting to me.

The uBiome Test Kit can be ordered on Good Gut Solution’s website and right now if you spend $120 on supplements you can get the uBiome test for free.

That sealed the deal for me. I ordered my usual supplements, made sure it included enough to get the free test, and added the test to my cart. The coupon code for the free test is UBIOME1. Don’t forget to add your date of birth in the space provided when you add it your basket.

In the meantime I was intrigued by uBiome. I went on line and checked out their site to find out who uBiome was. The test looked pretty simple and user friendly.

Basically you just order a kit, test the site area, send it in and wait six weeks. They had multiple areas of your body you could test but I was just interested in the Gut Test for now.

My test arrived the same week. I read the instructions, which by the way, were simple to understand and even had pictures.

I realized that I would have to wait until the morning to take the sample with my first bowel movement of the day.

For now, I went on line and set up my account. Pretty simple.

Create a log in user name and password. Since I intended to take my sample the following morning I entered that as my sample date. You can always take your sample at a later date if you wish too.

The next morning I took the sample. This might sound a little gross but it was really more like a science experiment. Included in my kit was a sample swab. The test instructions said to swab the toilet paper I had used to include just the slightest change in color on the swab.

I did that. Step two; put the swab in the collection tube and stir it up for a minute. This small vial has some sort of clear liquid in it.

Finally, put on the cap and shake for a minute.

Done.

Next drop it in the pouch and place in the mailer which is already prepaid and addressed to the uBiome lab.

It was so easy!

Next, I just wait for my results.

The instructions say that uBiome will email me when they receive my sample and when my results are posted in my account.

I can’t wait. When I get the results I’ll share all the details with you.

Until then, try some kimchi for breakfast.

What are Synbiotics?

Dr. Robynne ChutkanDr. Robynne Chutkan, an integrative gastroenterologist and best selling author of the “Microbiome Solution” was interviewed by Dr. Oz recently. She was talking about Irritable Bowel Syndrome, explaining how IBS can manifest both as IBS-C (with constipation) and IBS-D (with diarrhea). She went on to suggest than an excellent way to help both kinds of IBS is with synbiotics …. and tells you how to make your own at home.

What’s a Synbiotic?

Synbiotics are the dynamo combination of prebiotics and probiotics. Not only do they provide good food for gut bacteria but they also deliver significant amounts of live bacteria themselves. The probiotics are good, live bacteria for our gut while the prebiotics are the food for our beneficial gastro intestinal bacteria. She recommends synbiotics for both IBS-C and IBS-D.

How to make Synbiotics at Home

Dr. Chutkan explains how to transform your prebiotic foods into synbiotics at home. You start off by taking any prebiotic veggie and adding a teaspoon of salt. That’s it! So, chop up some carrots, asparagus, and onions and place then place them in a mason jar and cover them in water. Then add a teaspoon of salt and cover the jar with a paper towel and rubber band. Then let it sit on your counter for a week. They’ll keep for one month in your fridge. What happens is that all the good bacteria start to grow and turn your prebiotics into a synbiotic. It’s that easy to do at home!

What Happens when you don’t have time to make Synbiotics at Home?

Committing to eat fermented foods on a consistent basis may be difficult to achieve. Actually making synbiotics may be a challenge as well. That’s where our Perfect Pass Prebiotic and Probiotic Combination comes to the rescue. In reviewing many of our past blog posts, you’ll find that our philosophy on how to maintain a healthy gut synchronizes precisely with Dr Chutkan’s approach. We, too, encourage our clients to use a combination of prebiotics with probiotics, even when they don’t actually make the synbiotics at home, they create a similar environment in the gut by combining both pre and probiotics.

You need good gut bacteria, and lots of it to make a healthy microbiome. You know how important your gut bacteria is. You need to nurture it. You know, too, that a strong microbiome is constantly compromised by antibiotics, processed foods and environmental toxins. The bests way to nurture your microbiome is by feeding it. This will help increase the numbers. Yes, that’s right, you can feed your bacteria. This helps your microbiome grow strong and encourages the good bacteria to multiply. How do we do this? …by actually feeding it with prebiotics. Not all Prebiotics are the same There’s a difference between different types of prebiotics – like Inulin, FOS and PHGG. Inulin-type prebiotics include fructooligosaccharides (FOS), oligofructose, and inulin. Whereas PHGG is a galactooligosaccharides.

The preferred prebiotic type is galactooligosaccharides. Why? because they ferment slowly. When the soluble fiber ferments slowly, it doesn’t result in symptoms of gas and bloating which often happens with inulin and FOS which are known to cause digestive symptoms like gas and bloating as a result of their rapid speed of fermentation. That’s why our Perfect Pass Prebiotic PHGG is a pure galactooligosacaride – one that is known to ferment slowly and not cause any side effects. What’s more …. there’s valid clinical research to show how beneficial it is in combating SIBO as well as reducing symptoms of both diarrhea and constipation.

Why choose PHGG?

We prefer the prebiotic that is made from partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG). The process of hydrolyzation slows down the fermentation process to insure the likelihood that your good bacteria has time to feed on it. The guar gum is already partially broken down with water. Guar gum that is used in Perfect Pass Prebiotic is highly purified and extensively researched. It dissolves easily and fully in water and it’s easy for everyone to use. There’s no smell, no taste and it breaks down easily.

Good Gut Solution Special Prebiotic Offer

Based on our confidence on how effective the synbiotic concept is, we encourage all our clients to consider using our PHGG prebiotic  with any probiotic of their choice. Right now when you buy Perfect Pass Prebiotic with any of these probiotics, you receive 10% off the probiotics. You can choose from Dr. Ohhira, VSL, Visbiome or Primal Defense. No coupon is needed, simply place both in your cart to receive the discount. Better still, when you purchase Perfect Pass Prebiotic with Perfect Pass Probiotic, our favored probiotic, you’ll get 15% off the probiotics. No coupon is needed, simply put both in your cart to receive the discount.

Microbiome; Front and Center

The Human Super OrganismHow Understanding the Microbiome Can Help Us?

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could decrease the rise of chronic diseases.

Dr. Rodney Dietert just published his book on this topic, The Human Superorganism: How the Microbiome Is Revolutionizing the Pursuit of a Healthy Life. Dieterts’ book focuses on the study of microbiome diversity as it relates to our immune system. 

Rodney Dietert, Ph.D. is an internationally-known author, lecturer, scientist and professor of Immunotoxicology at Cornell.

His area of study focuses on how the origins of  asthma, autism, Alzheimer’s, allergies, cancer, heart disease, obesity, and even some kinds of depression are linked to our organisms which reside in our gut. We now know that the microbiome is responsible for our immune system function and has a direct link to our brain, controlling the neurotransmitters that produce our “feel good hormones.”  

Rodney Dietart MicrobiomeAward-winning researcher on the microbiome,  Rodney Dietert, presents this new paradigm in human biology that has emerged.

Dieters states,Given the intimate relationship between the human immune system and the microbiome, it is not surprising that alterations in our microbial makeup can greatly affect health.”

We couldn’t agree more and are so excited to see new information coming out daily from top experts on the human microbiome and it’s connection to the immune system and brain function.

In his book Dietert explains macrobiotic self care and how important probiotics are for maintaining strong immune system health.

Microbiome and Disease

Everyday we are finding more compelling reasons to ensure our microbiome is at the top of our priority list for good health. Dr. Ingrid Kohlstadt, MD, MPF recently wrote about the influence our microbiome has on disorders of the skin, eyes and seasonal allergy disorders. In her article, Dr. Kohlstadt states, “published research supports the assertion that all of these medical conditions are entwined with the health of the microbiome. Microbiome research is causing us to rethink long held scientific assumptions about the origins of disease. “

What’s clear is that more research needs to be done. Microbiomes are similar to ecosystems and can not be studied with double-blind, placebo controlled trials. What we can do is study the research findings in relation to patients symptoms.

Kiran Krishnan, gut bacteria, human microbiomeMicrobiologist Kiran Krishnan is doing just that. Currently Kiran and his team are running human clinical trials with people that have leaky gut. After 30 days on probiotic therapy they have shown no sign of leaky gut when eating an endotoxic meal consisting of a McDonald’s breakfast sandwich. For more information about probiotic therapy and to learn about the latest research from Kiran Krishnan listen to our seven part Microbiome Series. The latest interview will focus on Kiran’s research stemming from clinical trials.

Role of Probiotics in the Microbiome

What is the Role of Probiotics in the Microbiome?

The answer to the question has changed quite a bit over the last three to five years. We talked with Microbiologist Kiran Krishnan about how our understanding of the role of probiotics has shifted based on the latest research.  To listen to our interview with Kiran check out the latest installment of Good Gut Solutions Microbiome Series.

Kiran explained to us that 10 years ago scientists who studied probiotics would tell you that probiotic therapy is used to reseed the gut with good bacteria.  The idea was to grow these bacteria up in large factories, encapsulate them, put them in products, and you would reseed your gut with these good beneficial bacteria. The idea was that this was going to shift the balance between good and bad bacteria.

What Does the Latest Research on Microbiome Tell Us About How We Absorb Probiotics?

Now through research we know that this was developed prior to any understanding of the microbiome at all. We now know that really can’t reseed you gut. We now know that by a few years after birth, you have your full established microbiome. At that point, you can’t really reseed your microbiome with different organisms, especially lactobacillus and bifidobacter because those are the predominant organisms that you get from mom in the birthing process.

The idea of taking multiple different strains, growing them up and reintroducing them every day to try and reseed your gut just doesn’t work anymore. We know that most of those bacteria just die as they pass through the gastric system.

That being said, there are a number of lactobacillus, bifidobacter based products that have clinical evidence that they do have positive impact in the gut. Our understanding is that they provide symptomatic benefits. They’re not going and living in the gut. They’re actually just passing through. As they move through, certain strains have the ability to modulate the immune response because most of your immune tissue resides in the gut.  

What is the Difference in Treating Symptoms or Repairing the Gut With Probiotics?

With probiotics that treat the symptoms, the probiotics go in, they create a metabolic response, and then they come out in fecal matter. That’s why when you stop taking a lot of those probiotics, the symptoms that you’ve been dealing with come right back. You’re not really fixing the core issue.

Probiotics that treat symptoms are not probiotic by the scientific definition  because they don’t create a functional change in your gut permanently. What they do is they create a metabolic response in your gut as you consume them. This metabolic response will make you feel better immediately by alleviating stomach pain but as soon as you stop taking them the symptoms will return. This indicates that we’re not creating a functional change in the microbiome, and we’re not curing the problem.

What we really want to focus on is probiotic therapy. Is there a type of bacteria that has the ability to go in, survive through the gastric system, actually live in the gut, and create a functional change both to the microbiome and the immune system?

Is there a way to actually eliminate problems like IBS, Crohn’s, colitis, allergies, asthma, those kind of things, rather than just trying to manage the symptoms. That’s the big difference. The answer is yes.

Spore Based Probiotic Therapy Performs Long Term Benefits

Spore-based organisms are quite interesting. They’re one of the few organisms that fit the current definition of probiotic bacteria. The WHO (World Health Organization) has established what a probiotic is. Number one, it has to be a live microorganism. So you have to be able to show that it survives through the gastric system and gets to the intestines alive. It has to be one that can colonize and create a beneficial change for the host in terms of host microflora. These Bacillus spores have been studied extensively in human clinical trials and have a very long history of use. 

Kiran Krishnan, gut bacteria, human microbiomeStay tuned for our next Installment in the Microbiome Series. We will explain exciting findings on Spore Based Probiotic Therapy. If you haven’t tried spore based probiotics yet we urge you to do so. Our clients have the best results when they are taken for a two-three month period.

 

 

Copyright © 2017 Good Gut Solution.

Sheryl Cohen January 11, 2017