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Microbiome and Disease

Everyday we are finding more compelling reasons to ensure our microbiome is at the top of our priority list for good health. Dr. Ingrid Kohlstadt, MD, MPF recently wrote about the influence our microbiome has on disorders of the skin, eyes and seasonal allergy disorders. In her article, Dr. Kohlstadt states, “published research supports the assertion that all of these medical conditions are entwined with the health of the microbiome. Microbiome research is causing us to rethink long held scientific assumptions about the origins of disease. “

What’s clear is that more research needs to be done. Microbiomes are similar to ecosystems and can not be studied with double-blind, placebo controlled trials. What we can do is study the research findings in relation to patients symptoms.

Kiran Krishnan, gut bacteria, human microbiomeMicrobiologist Kiran Krishnan is doing just that. Currently Kiran and his team are running human clinical trials with people that have leaky gut. After 30 days on probiotic therapy they have shown no sign of leaky gut when eating an endotoxic meal consisting of a McDonald’s breakfast sandwich. For more information about probiotic therapy and to learn about the latest research from Kiran Krishnan listen to our seven part Microbiome Series. The latest interview will focus on Kiran’s research stemming from clinical trials.

Probiotic & Prebiotic Awareness on the Rise

The Probiota Americas Conference in Chicago this past month produced exciting new information on probiotics and consumers awareness of their benefits. Some hopeful information came from a recent survey by AIDP which measured consumers usage of prebiotics and probiotics.

Probiotics & Prebiotics in our MicrobiomeWhat we learned is that the word is getting out.  In an article by Hank Schultz, he talked about the survey results. “In a poll of 400 dietary supplement users, it was revealed that more than 38% would be very likely or somewhat likely to try a prebiotic with strong digestive and immune health benefits. The survey also showed that 44% of these consumers had tried a probiotic supplement. Further results showed that more than 60% of respondents would be interested in buying a product that contained both a prebiotic and a probiotic.” This reflects a better understanding of the role these supplements have in digestive and immune wellness. 

Furthermore consumers would be more likely to try a product that was backed by research and human clinical trials. The vast majority of solid probiotic research has occurred in just the past 3 years with the conclusion of the largest consortium of scientific research on the human gut ecology called Human Microbiome Project. For the latest findings and research in relation to probiotics check our Microbiome Series with Microbiologist Kiran Krishnan.

What is the Difference Between a Probiotic and Prebiotic?

We know that feeding the existing bacteria is just as important as introducing new bacteria in the gut. Prebiotics stimulate the growth and maintenance of our beneficial gut microbiota. Probiotics increase the diversity of our bacteria and increase its numbers. Our clients have reported the most improved results when taking both a prebiotic and probiotic together for a two-three month period.

Role of Probiotics in the Microbiome

What is the Role of Probiotics in the Microbiome?

The answer to the question has changed quite a bit over the last three to five years. We talked with Microbiologist Kiran Krishnan about how our understanding of the role of probiotics has shifted based on the latest research.  To listen to our interview with Kiran check out the latest installment of Good Gut Solutions Microbiome Series.

Kiran explained to us that 10 years ago scientists who studied probiotics would tell you that probiotic therapy is used to reseed the gut with good bacteria.  The idea was to grow these bacteria up in large factories, encapsulate them, put them in products, and you would reseed your gut with these good beneficial bacteria. The idea was that this was going to shift the balance between good and bad bacteria.

What Does the Latest Research on Microbiome Tell Us About How We Absorb Probiotics?

Now through research we know that this was developed prior to any understanding of the microbiome at all. We now know that really can’t reseed you gut. We now know that by a few years after birth, you have your full established microbiome. At that point, you can’t really reseed your microbiome with different organisms, especially lactobacillus and bifidobacter because those are the predominant organisms that you get from mom in the birthing process.

The idea of taking multiple different strains, growing them up and reintroducing them every day to try and reseed your gut just doesn’t work anymore. We know that most of those bacteria just die as they pass through the gastric system.

That being said, there are a number of lactobacillus, bifidobacter based products that have clinical evidence that they do have positive impact in the gut. Our understanding is that they provide symptomatic benefits. They’re not going and living in the gut. They’re actually just passing through. As they move through, certain strains have the ability to modulate the immune response because most of your immune tissue resides in the gut.  

What is the Difference in Treating Symptoms or Repairing the Gut With Probiotics?

With probiotics that treat the symptoms, the probiotics go in, they create a metabolic response, and then they come out in fecal matter. That’s why when you stop taking a lot of those probiotics, the symptoms that you’ve been dealing with come right back. You’re not really fixing the core issue.

Probiotics that treat symptoms are not probiotic by the scientific definition  because they don’t create a functional change in your gut permanently. What they do is they create a metabolic response in your gut as you consume them. This metabolic response will make you feel better immediately by alleviating stomach pain but as soon as you stop taking them the symptoms will return. This indicates that we’re not creating a functional change in the microbiome, and we’re not curing the problem.

What we really want to focus on is probiotic therapy. Is there a type of bacteria that has the ability to go in, survive through the gastric system, actually live in the gut, and create a functional change both to the microbiome and the immune system?

Is there a way to actually eliminate problems like IBS, Crohn’s, colitis, allergies, asthma, those kind of things, rather than just trying to manage the symptoms. That’s the big difference. The answer is yes.

Spore Based Probiotic Therapy Performs Long Term Benefits

Spore-based organisms are quite interesting. They’re one of the few organisms that fit the current definition of probiotic bacteria. The WHO (World Health Organization) has established what a probiotic is. Number one, it has to be a live microorganism. So you have to be able to show that it survives through the gastric system and gets to the intestines alive. It has to be one that can colonize and create a beneficial change for the host in terms of host microflora. These Bacillus spores have been studied extensively in human clinical trials and have a very long history of use. 

Kiran Krishnan, gut bacteria, human microbiomeStay tuned for our next Installment in the Microbiome Series. We will explain exciting findings on Spore Based Probiotic Therapy. If you haven’t tried spore based probiotics yet we urge you to do so. Our clients have the best results when they are taken for a two-three month period.

 

 

Does Everyone Need Spore Based Probiotics

Microbiome Information from Kiran Krishnan

We sat down with Kiran Krishnan, microbiologist and microbiome researcher. We asked him the question, “Does everybody need to take a spore based probiotic?”   

A lot of people will say, “You know what? I don’t really have any particular digestive issues. Do I really need to take this product?”

If you eat a very clean diet, you may be thinking the same thing. You may feel feel that you get everything you need from the nutrients you eat in fruits and vegetables. 

Kiran’s research shows that often we do not get the bacteria we need in our diet.  If you were living off the land, if you lived on the side of a mountain, you grew your own food, you forage the roots of tubers, you definitely don’t need them. However, if you live in a city or you live in a modern house or apartment building, you’re going to need them. If you buy your foods in the grocery store, you’re going to need them. 

If you look at the course of human evolution, you will see that we naturally were exposed to these types of bacteria.  Our hunter, gather, foraging ancestors who ate and lived off the land got huge doses of these particular bacteria on a daily basis every time they ate or drank from their environment. That’s why these bacteria have developed this long-term symbiotic relationship with the body.

Our ancestors maintained their good but bacteria naturally for millions of years. The problem is we don’t get them in our food anymore. Our food supply has changed along with how we obtain our food and how we eat it.

How Do We Benefit From the Bacteria Once They Are Established in our Gut?

They create a protective barrier for the body from the outside world

They detoxify the gut

They improve the growth of good bacteria

They suppress the bad bacteria

They train the immune system 

All of these things are necessary on a daily basis because the modern lifestyle that we live is very much an assault to our system.

What Destroys Our Microbiome?

GMOs that we’re exposed to in our food

Chemicals in our household and our personal care products

Antibiotics

Toxic chemicals in our drinking water

All those things target and affect the gut in a negative way on a daily basis. We need these spores in there to reverse that damage which we’re doing every day. We need them as a protective system within the gut itself.

Kiran Krishnan, gut bacteria, human microbiomeClick here to listen to our interview with Kiran on You tube. Check out our 6 Part Series on the Microbiome with Kiran Krishnan. You can find out the latest findings from their new human clinical trials.

 

Why is it Important to Have Good Gut Bacteria During Your Pregnancy?

Where Does our Micro-biome Come From?

Did you know that as an expectant mother it’s even more important to have healthy gut bacteria? We know that having a healthy diet is crucial for a developing baby. What most people don’t know is that our micro-biome, this is our “good gut bacteria”, is passed on to our baby during the birthing process and though our breast milk.

GGS Image BacteriaWe have lots of new information from microbiologist Kiran Krishnan about these important microbes. We love sharing all the latest research with you. Check out our second installment of the Microbiome Series.

Kiran explains that 99.9% of our micro-biome is passed on during the birthing process through the birth canal. There are up to 800 different species of these bacteria found in a mothers breast milk. We think you’ll agree that it’s so important to pass the best possible micro-biome on to your children.

Kiran’s research shows that by the age of 2 1/2  children have established their full adult micro-biome. Lets take a look at the lifestyle factors that can affect the diversity and abundance of these protective organisms in our gut.

 Negative Effects on Good Gut Bacteria During Pregnancy and Childhood

  • Antibiotics wipe out the good bacteria with the bad
  • Fluoride in our drinking water will negatively affect the good gut bacteria
  • Toxic household cleaners should be avoided, check out the EWG guide to see how yours’ are ranked
  • Preservatives in our food are a no no
  • Living too cleanly…let your children get into the dirt and get dirty

Kiran Krishnan, gut bacteria, human microbiome

 

Stay tuned for the next installment in our series of talks with Kiran and learn about the latest research findings on the Human Micro-biome and Perfect Pass Probiotics. Kiran has been studying the micro-biome and researching the effects of Bacillus strain probiotics in over one dozen clinical trials.

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