Crohn’s & Colitis-Join the Team Challenge

What is Team Challenge? 

The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation is sponsoring the Team Challenge Race for the Cure Fundraiser.

Crohn's & Colitis Team Challenge

The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundations mission is to cure Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and to improve the quality of life of children and adults affected by these diseases.

Whether you have been directly affected by one of these diseases or want to support a loved one with Crohn’s or colitis, supporting this cause is so worthwhile. The foundation has already invested over $280 million in research.  More than 80% of each $1 raised goes towards research, education and support.

What does the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation do?

Since this non-profit was started, nearly five decades ago, the CCF has remained at the forefront of research in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. They fund cutting-edge studies at major medical institutions, finance underdeveloped areas of research and enable medical professionals to keep pace with this rapidly growing field.

For those suffering with Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis they provide a forum of education, support and resources.

The Team Challenge Race event is an endurance training and fundraising program to raise money for research that could impact the scientific community’s understanding of the causes, cures and treatments for IBD. One of their current initiatives includes the research on the Microbiome. This event has raised  $71 million dollars to date since 2007.

How can you support the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation?

You can sign up to compete in a 5K, 10K, Half Marathon or Full Marathon. Check the site for more details on the fundraising program. There are even triathlon, Iron man and cycling events. Find the team that works best for you. Teammates receive professional coaching, free accommodation at select events, race entry, and fundraising mentorship.

Be a part of the cure and sign up today. Click Here 

Former Soccer Star Raises Awareness for IBD

Brandi Chastain, IBD, IBDGamePlan.com

Brandi Chastain Raises Awareness for IBD

Brandi Chastain, former soccer star who played for the  United States women’s national soccer team from 1988 to 2004, is raising awareness for a new site called IBDGamePlan.com. The site is full of helpful tools and resources for living a normal life with IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease). The site has valuable information about Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, gastrointestinal specialists in your area and guidelines to help you manage your condition.

When Brandi Chastain is passionate about a cause she steps up to the plate to give back. Earlier this year the Concussion Legacy Foundation announced that Brandi Chastain,  will donate her brain to the foundation, whereupon it will be studied by researchers from the C.T.E. Center at Boston University, one of the foremost pioneers in the field.

It’s no surprise that when her son was diagnosed with Crohn’s last year, at the age of 9, that Brandi went above and beyond to raise awareness. “It’s crucial to have team support and a game plan” says Brandi. Read the full story here about the IBDGamePlan.com site launch. Brandi will be sharing her story through the site to raise awareness and provide helpful information and support.

 

Crohn’s Disease vs. IBS

Crohn’s disease affects more than half a million people in the United States, while anywhere from 10 to 15 percent of the population has irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The two conditions are very different, although they affect the same area of the body.

Crohn’s disease causes inflammation of the digestive system and can affect any area of the GI track, from the mouth to the anus, although it most often affects the end of the small intestine and the start of the colon. Crohn’s disease is included in a group of conditions collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease.

Symptoms of active Crohn’s disease include diarrhea, abdominal cramping, bloody stool, fever, and fatigue. Reduced appetite and weight loss are also symptoms of Crohn’s disease, which can only be diagnosed by a doctor. Research is mixed, but there may be a link between Crohn’s disease and later development of colorectal cancer.

Complications from Crohn’s disease may include ulcers on the walls of the intestine, holes in the bowel, abscess in the abdomen, pelvis or anal area, or even a narrowing of the intestine caused by scarring. Individuals with Crohn’s disease may not absorb nutrients properly.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, is not the same as irritable bowel disease, IBD, which is the category of conditions into which Crohn’s disease falls. IBS does not cause inflammation, but does involve a change in bowel function.

Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea or constipation, or some combination of the two. Many individuals can control IBS with medication and changes in diet. Stress and hormones may trigger episodes of IBS. This chronic condition does not increase one’s risk for colorectal cancer or cause changes in bowel tissue, unlike Crohn’s disease and related conditions.

Doctors can determine whether the symptoms one is experiencing are from IBS or Crohn’s disease and develop a treatment plan that helps a patient to control his or her symptoms.

Hidden Causes of Constipation

Toilet humor may be funny—but regular constipation is not. Constipation can greatly affect a person’s quality of life and general sense of health and well being. More importantly, constipation can take a significant toll on the body. Here’s a list of surprising triggers for constipation:


Prescription Painkillers

Painkillers are a common medication prescribed by physicians after surgery or in the case of chronic pain. However, several common painkillers, especially narcotic-based medications, cause constipation. If prescribed narcotics or similar painkillers, it would be wise to also take a mild laxative to ensure regularity.

Chocolate and Dairy

Some of our favorite foods can also cause constipation. Chocolate and dairy products have both been linked to constipation. Sadly, there have been studies linking chocolate to constipation, mostly among individuals who already suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Diets containing too much dairy including cheese, yogurt, eggs, and milk have also been linked to constipation. Limiting chocolate and dairy and incorporating more fiber into your diet is a good place to start if you suspect you may be constipated.

Vitamins and Over-the-Counter Medications

Sometimes we head to the drug store when we’re not feeling well. But hidden in those over-the-counter remedies can be causes of constipation.

Vitamins, for example, are great to take as daily supplements, however, too much of a good thing is usually not so good. Excessive iron and calcium may cause constipation.

The overuse of laxatives can actually cause serious constipation issues as well. As is the case with most drugs, the body will eventually become dependent on laxatives to function and won’t regulate on its own.

Antacids are another, seemingly harmless over-the-counter pill that can actually cause constipation. Antacids containing calcium or aluminum are usually suspect. Fortunately there are options available without these two ingredients. You could also cut back on foods that cause indigestion and heartburn.

Pre-Existing Conditions

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) include the chronic conditions of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Both of these conditions can manifest symptoms of constipation, resulting from various points of inflammation in either the small intestine or the rectum.

People with advanced diabetes may experience constipation whether they’re aware they have diabetes or not. Diabetes may cause significant damage to the nerve endings that are responsible for digesting food. Constipation may result in these cases.

Depression affects millions of people, and it can cause constipation in two distinct ways. Depression causes the body’s systems to slow down, which can affect the speed of the bowels. Moreover, antidepressants containing serotonin reuptake inhibitors (like Prozac) have also been linked to constipation. Fortunately, there are new medications available that do not result in bowel obstruction.

Finally, hypothyroidism results in a slowing of the metabolic processes, which leads to constipation and issues in the gut.

Fortunately there are ways to combat constipation safely and effectively without resorting to major lifestyle changes. Taking a natural laxative can increase regularity and ultimately improve the health of your gut.

A OK Natural Laxatives also assists in removing harmful toxins and contains cleansing agents and natural herbs. Don’t wait until you can’t go to do something about constipation. Keep a natural laxative handy and take it at the first signs of irregularity to ensure a happy and health gut.

Treating Crohns Disease With High Fiber foods

I read this interesting forum in crohnsforum.com about how high fiber foods could naturally stop crohn’s flare ups.

They say that it has been several years since researchers published findings that eating broccoli and plantains could be good medicine for Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

But…the question is,  how many doctors have recommended the food as a dietary approach to control symptoms of Irritable bowel syndrome (IBD)?
They talk about diet and treating IBD, but neglect to talk about the importance of eating specific foods. I for one, found this fascinating.

Kathleen Blanchard from EmaxHealth reports about what fiber does for the gut and how it can help IBD.

She says, that fiber is suggested as an important dietary intervention for anyone dealing with Crohn’s disease. Not only does fiber add bulk to the diet to help keep bowel movements formed, but it also can prevent constipation. She goes on to say that people who suffer with crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) know that not all fiber is created equal and that it can also cause pain as well as bloating.

In 2010, researchers published findings in the British Medical Journal, that fiber in broccoli and plantains can stop relapses of Crohn’s disease. The fibers halt translocation of gut bacteria known as E. coli that typically invades cells in the intestines to lead to Crohn’s disease symptoms.

When apples and leeks were tested, the fibers had no impact on the bacteria, which helps explain why not all fibrous foods are beneficial for people suffering from IBD.

The research was performed in the lab on cell cultures and the amount of broccoli and plantain fiber used was 5 mg/ml. The food stopped translocation of E. coli by 45% to 82 %.

Researchers then confirmed their findings by taking tissue samples from patients undergoing surgery for other disorders of the intestines. Another interesting finding from the same study  was that the emulsifiers polysorbate 60 and 80 increased the movement of E.coli into cells.

The authors suggested many enteral nutritional products that are liquid given through a tube or consumed  by mouth contain the emulsifiers which could explain why only some people with CD and UC respond to liquid feedings.

Based on the study finding, plantain & broccoli could be a helpful addition for treating Crohn’s disease. The authors of the investigation hope to develop other food based therapies for helping people diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Disease.

Read the full study on Broccoli, Plantains and Crohn’s Disease in Emaxhealth.com