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What are Human Strain Probiotics?

What are Human Strain Probiotics?

Are Human Strain Probiotics superior? Yes, they are.

When discussing probiotics, the term “human strain” is not well understood at all.

It actually refers to probiotic strains that are recognised by the human body and therefore compatible with the human body.

Inspite of the name, “human-strain” probiotics don’t actually involve humans or human byproducts as ingredients. They’re just a particular species of microorganisms that naturally (or exclusively) live in nature as well as in the human already.

Recent Human Microbiome Project research done by NIH, the National Institute for Health, has defined probiotics by strict criteria. We see lots of references on line that quote the ‘old’ definition. They are not correct and out of date.

This is how a ‘true’ probiotic is now defined:

1. The organism must be a normally occurring organism in the digestive tract.
2. In order to consistently trigger a healthy boost in immune function the organism must be supplemented in concentrations higher than what normally occurs in the digestive tract.
3. The organism must be able to survive in the digestive tract as well as in the environment. i.e. not be affected by stomach acid and bile. 

This new information supercedes the ‘old’ definition that said:  “probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confers a health benefit on the host.”

Interestingly enough there are very few probiotics in the marketplace today that meet all three of these criteria!

Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria

Most probiotics available on the market today contain Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria species. According to the new probiotic criteria, they do meet the first requirement defined by NIH research. They do naturally occur in the digestive tract.

In fact, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria species are in very high concentrations in the digestive tract of humans. But that is precisely why these two bacteria don’t meet criteria #2. 

There are more that 20 trillion lactobacillus and bifidobacteria species in the average human digestive tract. Most probiotics on the shelf contain 100 – 200 billion strains. This is not nearly the amount that would result in long term benefit.  This also assumes that the bacteria survive the digestive tract. 

Research shows that a majority of orally supplemented lactobacillus and bifidobacteria species are destroyed by the conditions found in the stomach and upper digestive tract. Only few survive.

Another important factor is that lactobacillus and bifidobacteria are anaerobic organisms that are designed to live in the digestive tract. They don’t normally live in the environment because they are sensitive to the presence of oxygen, UV light and other chemicals found in the natural environment.

This means they do not fit #3 requirement of our new definition of probiotics either.

In actual fact, people get their initial dose of lactobacillus and bifidobacteria from their mothers through birth and breast feeding.

Later in life, it’s necessary for orally derived probiotics to be organisms that live naturally in the environment as well as in the digestive system so that they can be recognized by the human microbiota.

What about yogurt?

In light of this information, yogurts and yogurt based drinks like kefir, don’t work as probiotics. They do have benefits but that’s from the fermentation process and those benefits are contained in the product in the form of micro-nutrients.

But those strains used in yogurts and other fermented dairy products, don’t have the ability to survive the harsh stomach acids and actually don’t colonize in the GI. For a true probiotic, we need one that will survive the stomach acid. We need human strain probiotics.

What we refer to as human strain probiotics are ones that are found in nature in the identical form as they are found in the human body.

They are known as commensal organisms. They can’t be used to grow yogurt. They have to be harvested from nature.

The strains we recommend are bacillus strains that are contained in endospores. Nature has designed these spores to be daily, foundational food.

  • They are transient microorganisms, so they don’t stay in the gut forever.
  • They go in, they perform their function and than they leave.

This is important factor, as this helps to keep their numbers in the digestive tract relatively low and that’s why each does is relatively low.

FYI –  It usually takes about 21 days to reach a steady state of concentration in the gut when they are taken on a daily basis.  

We suggest eating a diet low that is low in refined sugars and higher in fibers so that we encourage our own good bacteria to grow. In fact, the spores are able to increase the growth of the good bacteria present in the gut as well.

Between the spores being present and an improved diet, we are able to create the right microbiota balance. If the spores are removed, then we are disturbing the balance that may lead to what we call ‘Dysbiosis‘.

This is why we recommend taking Perfect Pass Bacillus Spore Probiotics on a daily basis as it’s important to maintaining good bacteria balance. We constantly bombard our digestive system on a daily basis. The bacillus spores are great at monitoring our gut and keeping it in balance.

Take advantage of our human strain Perfect Pass Probiotic special.

Get 15% off when you buy it together with Perfect Pass Prebiotic – the soluble fiber that encourages the human strain spores to grow.

New Year, New Gut

Our New Years Gift to You, our valued Customer. 

Here’s an easy way to find out what’s in your gut so you can start the New Year ensuring you have a healthy digestive tract by making certain that your microbiome is teeming with lots and lots of good bacteria. 

Microbiome

How can you do that? 

uBiome Gut Test lets you take your health into your own hands. Their simple at home swab test literally takes 2 minutes, and valued at $89, is your first line of defense. 

And no need to pay for it now. For a limited time only, simply place an order with Good Gut Solution for supplements totaling $120 and add the sku for the uBiome Gut Test-uBiome-to your order. then use coupon code UBIOME1 to receive your complimentary test.

 uBiome was started in 2012 by researchers from Stanford, Oxford, and UCSF. They developed a simple, quick way to test the bacteria in your gut. See how you do it. Click Here for Instructions.

You see, your gut is made up of 100 trillion bacteria cells that have direct influence on your health. All these 100 trillion cells make up your unique microbiome.

Know what bacteria your unique microbiome consist of and then model your supplement program on what you learn from the test.

Here’s what you do to send it in.

https://app.ubiome.com

uBiome test kit instructions

*PLEASE NOTE

Remember to include your date of birth when you place your order. The uBiome lab needs that information for accuracy.

Did you know?

The systems the microbiome influence are tremendous, virtually every system in our body including:

  • Digestion
  • Immune system
  • Cognitive function
  • Nutrient Absorption

So with the intrinsic link between these systems and your microbiome, it makes sense to put this at the top of your priority list when looking at ways to improve your overall health.

What will be in my Ubiome Results?uBiome Results

Once the sequencing of your unique microbiome is complete you will receive an email. You simply log in to your account for a detailed, easy to understand report on your microorganisms.

uBiome uses DNA sequencing technology to identify specific individual bacteria strains. Your report will include detailed information on each of the bacteria found. This includes the name of each bacteria strain, the total number and what their function is in your body.

You can also compare your rmicrobiome results with the results of others. See how your microbiome compares with other groups; vegans, those taking antibiotics or those that smoke.

Pamela Nathan Gut Health Series Interview

Pamela Nathan’s Interview with Leah Kline

I recently participated in Leah Kline’s Gut Health Symposium. What a great panel of speakers she interviewed. There was so much to be learned from so many different experts talking about many different aspects of gut health. Not only was the information invaluable but there were lots of free giveaways as well.

Leah was curious to hear about how I was introduced to holistic medicine. Then she went on to ask me about my current ‘pet’ topics, like, how our understanding of what probiotics really are has changed since the completion of the Human Microbiome Project, as well as why I think prebiotics are so important with today’s challenges in maintaining excellent gut function.

Here’s the interview in case you missed it.

Probiotic & Prebiotic Awareness on the Rise

The Probiota Americas Conference in Chicago this past month produced exciting new information on probiotics and consumers awareness of their benefits. Some hopeful information came from a recent survey by AIDP which measured consumers usage of prebiotics and probiotics.

Probiotics & Prebiotics in our MicrobiomeWhat we learned is that the word is getting out.  In an article by Hank Schultz, he talked about the survey results. “In a poll of 400 dietary supplement users, it was revealed that more than 38% would be very likely or somewhat likely to try a prebiotic with strong digestive and immune health benefits. The survey also showed that 44% of these consumers had tried a probiotic supplement. Further results showed that more than 60% of respondents would be interested in buying a product that contained both a prebiotic and a probiotic.” This reflects a better understanding of the role these supplements have in digestive and immune wellness. 

Furthermore consumers would be more likely to try a product that was backed by research and human clinical trials. The vast majority of solid probiotic research has occurred in just the past 3 years with the conclusion of the largest consortium of scientific research on the human gut ecology called Human Microbiome Project. For the latest findings and research in relation to probiotics check our Microbiome Series with Microbiologist Kiran Krishnan.

What is the Difference Between a Probiotic and Prebiotic?

We know that feeding the existing bacteria is just as important as introducing new bacteria in the gut. Prebiotics stimulate the growth and maintenance of our beneficial gut microbiota. Probiotics increase the diversity of our bacteria and increase its numbers. Our clients have reported the most improved results when taking both a prebiotic and probiotic together for a two-three month period.

Ask a Microbiologist: 7 Surprising Scientific Facts About Probiotics

7 surprising facts about probiotics

When it comes to probiotics, there are plenty of marketers clamoring for attention. From billions of strains to special coatings–we’ve heard it all. But if you ask for scientific proof, those voices die down. What gives?

Kiran Krishnan, a renowned microbiologist, is a part of a group of doctors and researchers hired to investigate and conduct clinical trials around the “next generation” of probiotics. Just in time, too. Their 10-year intensive study coincides with the Human Microbiome Project (HMP), a massive nationwide research project with a focus on microorganisms’ effects on human beings. Krishnan is the scientist behind Perfect Pass Probiotics.

We recently sat down with Krishnan and he gave us an inside look at 7 scientific facts about probiotics.

 

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Tammy Grassi January 31, 2017