Dr. Pamela Nathan DHM L.Ac. has been delivering health to your front door since 1998. Happy patients in over 78 countries.

Free Shipping Over $69**

Shopping Cart

Your cart is currently empty.

Do You Know What Dysbiosis is?

You may have heard this term in relation to gut health and wondered what it exactly does it mean.

It means “microbial imbalance on or inside the body”.  This can be the root cause of many health problems, particularly when there is dysbiosis in the gut. Since the gut controls the brain and the immune system, one can only imagine what havoc it brings upon us when it’s out of balance.

Our gut contains millions of bacteria. Some good and some bad. It is important to have the right balance of bacteria so our bodies can function well. If the bacteria is out of wack, we can experience a wide array of very unpleasant symptoms.

What are the Symptoms of Dysbiosis?

    • Gastrointestinal problems such as yeast overgrowth (candida), IBS, food allergies, gas and bloating
    • Urinary problems such as chronic urinary tract infections
    • Chronic colds/coughs, and ear infections
    • Lack of energy
    • Rashes, including eczema, hives, rosacea, and acne.
    • Respiratory problems such as asthma, sinusitis, allergies.

What Causes Dysbiosis:

  • Poor Diet
  • Exposure to toxins
  • Too many antibiotics
  • Stress

Too often people just address one or two of these causes. In order for your symptoms to go away permanently it’s crucial to pay attention to all issues which cause imbalance.

First and foremost, uncover what the root cause of your symptoms are by taking a simple at home gut test. We like the tests offered by Genova and Doctors Data. These kits can be ordered based on what symptoms you are experiencing. If you need help determining what test is right for you just give us a call and we are happy to help.

How Can I Get My Gut Bacteria Back in balance?

Diet can be the most important factor in relieving dysbiosis. Eat whole foods that come from the ground and eliminate processed foods and sugar. We recommend the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. This Diet works by addressing the root cause of digestive disease. It heals the gut by calming down the  inflammation and re-balancing the gut bacteria.

Read more about the Specific Carbohydrate Diet by clicking here. Choose the version of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet that’s custom fit for your needs. Once you start the SCD it will become second nature. For ideas on what to make for meals give the Specific Carbohydrate Diet Recipe Book a try.

Alleviate stress by incorporating breathing techniques, meditation or yoga into your daily routine. There are many ways to incorporate stress reduction techniques in as little as five minutes a day. Check out some of the apps which can be downloaded on your phone for easy to use guided mediations and breathing exercises while you’re on the go.  Visit the Stress Help Center web site. There is a very cost effective special offer on the 8 Week Module. This simple to use program provides instruction which can done at your desk or your most comfortable living room chair.

Have you taken antibiotics in the last year?

Always supplement with probiotics during and after a course of antibiotics. The antibiotics clear out all your good gut bacteria. Microbiologist Kiran Krishnan has been researching gut health for over 10 years. His clinical trials show that just one course of antibiotics will eliminate all your good gut bacteria. If you do nothing to build up the good bacteria it can take over a year for your gut to return to normal.

During the cold and flu season you want your immune system functioning at optimal levels. Don’t waste any time in replenishing your good bacteria and building up your immune system. We advise our clients to take the Perfect Pass Probiotic before and during antibiotic use. For best results to rebuilding your immunity add Perfect Pass Immune Support after a course of antibiotics.

Can You Detox Naturally?

If you have a build up of toxins that is causing your symptoms consider detoxing with natural agents. Good Gut Solution recommends HVS Detoxosodes for removing specific toxins such as heavy metals, chemicals, parasites, molds and tobacco. Customize your detoxification program once you have your test results. Call us if you have any questions.

Dysbiosis Testing and Treatment

Gut Dysbiosis – Test, Treat & Feel Better

Test now for Dysbiosis with Genova Intestinal Permeability home test

Genova Intestinal Permeability Home Urine Test

Use this simple test, which is delivered directly to your home from Genova Labs to help you understand whether your digestive complaints are related to dysbiosis or not.

Dysbiosis can present with a wide variety of symptoms. This is an excellent, easy way to gain more information about how well your intestines are functioning.

The test analyzes urine for the clearance of two sugars that are not metabolized. They are called lactulose and mannitol. How these two sugars clear as well as the ratio between them, helps to identify dysbiosis. Dysbiosis is also referred to, ‘leaky gut syndrome’ and malabsorption.

Here are some recommended supplements for Dysbiosis:

What is Dysbiosis?

Dysbiosis means there is an overgrowth of yeast, harmful bacteria, viruses or parasites in the intestines.

Dysbiosis is merely a more general term relating to an overgrowth of pathogens. Yeasts are not the only intestinal residents that may cause these symptoms. In fact, intestinal bacteria or viruses are often the culprits and not yeast. Severe dysbiosis sufferers will have overgrowth of both fungus and pathogenic bacteria in their intestines.

Dr. Metchinkoff, a Russian Scientist, was the one to popularize the idea of “Dys-symbiosis, or Dysbiosis,” which is a state of living with intestinal flora that have harmful effects. He suggested that toxic amines produced by bacterial putrefaction of food were the cause of degenerative diseases, and that by eating fermented foods containing Lactobacilli we could prolong life by reducing gut putrefaction. The thought of dysbiosis with digestive flora as an influence in the way inflammatory diseases and cancer develops, has received considerable experimental support over the past twenty years.

Symptoms of Dysbiosis

Dysbiosis does more than interfere with digestion, it makes you tired. Dysbiosis also alters your immune system and upsets your hormonal balance. Dysbiosis can even make it difficult for you to think clearly. It is known to cause anxiety, depression or mood swings. In fact, dysbiosis can affect almost every aspect of health.

If you have dysbiosis, then you are likely to suffer from fatigue, headaches, intestinal upsets, and many of the symptoms normally thought of to be associated with Candida.

What causes Dysbiosis?

Changes in the ratios of the gut flora may lead to disease. Bacterial enzymes can also alter the intestinal environment in many ways, some of which can be easily measured in a properly collected sample of stool and evaluated by Genova Lab. Bacterial antigens may cause dysfunctional immune responses that encourage autoimmune diseases of the bowel and of connective tissue. Effective treatment of dysbiosis may be achieved with diet and anti-microbial supplements.

Sometimes, changes in diet and using probiotics do not help to reduce symptoms. This may mean that there is small bowel bacterial overgrowth, which is a disorder that demands a different approach.

Based on available research and clinical data, generally there are four causes of dysbiosis: intestinal putrefaction, fermentation, deficiency and sensitization.

  1. Putrefaction

    Putrefaction dysbiosis results from diets high in fat and animal flesh and low in insoluble fiber. You can help this kind of dysbiosis by decreasing dietary fat and flesh, increasing fiber consumption and taking Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus probiotics.When there is a decrease in probiotics, or friendly bacteria, the production of short-chain fatty acids and other beneficial nutrients is reduced. There is also an increase in ammonia which can have negative effects on many bodily functions. Research suggests that this type of dysbiosis is contributing towards colon cancer and breast cancer.
  2. Fermentation (Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth)

    This is a condition of overgrowth of bacteria in the stomach, small intestine and beginning of the large intestine and causes carbohydrate intolerance.This may be the only symptom of bacterial overgrowth, making it very difficult to distinguish it from intestinal candidiasis.Gastric bacterial overgrowth increases the risk of systemic infection. British physicians who have been researching gut-fermentation syndrome think that, based on treatment results, the majority of cases are due to overgrowth and about 20% are bacterial in origin. The symptoms include abdominal distension, carbohydrate intolerance, fatigue and impaired mental function.

    Bacterial overgrowth here is encouraged by:

    • hypochlorhydria or low stomach acid
    • sluggishness due to abnormal bowel motility,
    • immune deficiency or
    • by malnutrition.

    Its important to understand that bacterial overgrowth in the intestines, increases the risk of systemic infection and can lead to intolerance to carbohydrates. Any carbohydrate that are eaten are fermented by bacteria and this results in toxic waste products being produced.

    Dietary sugars can be fermented to produce ethanol.
    Chronic exposure of the small bowel to ethanol may increase intestinal permeability.

  3. Deficiency

    Taking antibiotics or eating a diet low in soluble fiber may create a deficiency of normal friendly flora, i.e. BifidobacteriaLactobacillus and E.Coli. This condition has been described in patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and food intolerance. Deficiency and putrefaction dysbiosis are complementary conditions which often happen at the same time and call for the same treatment regime.
  4. Sensitization 

    Aggravation of abnormal immune responses to aspects of the normal intestinal flora may add to the development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis), spinal arthritis and other connective tissue disease and skin disorders such as psoriasis or acne.

Recommendations for Putrefaction and Fermentation Dysbiosis

For putrefaction dysbiosis a diet high in both soluble and insoluble fiber and low in saturated fat and animal protein is recommended.

These dietary changes help to lower the concentrations of Bacteroides and also increase concentrations of lactic acid-producing bacteria like Bifidobacteria, Lactobacillus and beneficial lactic acid streptococcus in the colon.

For fermentation dysbiosis, on the other hand, starch and soluble fiber can exacerbate the abnormal gut ecology. When the small intestine is involved, simple sugars are also not advisable. A diet free of cereal grains and added sugar is recommended.

Fruit, fat and starchy vegetables are tolerated to variable degree for each individual. Oligosaccharides found in some vegetables, carrots in particular, inhibit the binding of enterobacteria to the intestinal mucosa.

Make the necessary dietary changes to help keep your symptoms under contol

Microbiome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease IBD

Human Microbiome for IBD treatment

Courtesy of : ondineblog.com

There’s a lot of recent talk about something called the human microbiome. I read a very interesting article by Chris Iliades, MD that was reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi. They say that the human microbiome has now become one of the most researched medical subject. Those of us who have been advocating use of probiotics for years and years now, have been well aware of the importance of probiotics and microbiota to a healthy digestive tract. Finally, allopatic medical research is catching up, and their findings could lead to a revolution in human health. For those suffering with crohns and colitis, i.e. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), this microbiome research could hold the key to future successful treatment and even prevention.

Keith Sultan, MD, assistant professor at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine and gastroenterologist at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. tells us that the human microbiome is all the microbes that normally live inside the human digestive system and he says that for doctors who treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the big interest is in bacteria that live inside the colon and small intestine. He thinks that these bacteria may be the key to controlling the condition (IBD).

He goes on to explain how everyone has zillions of microbes living inside their digestive tract. These microbes, collectively known as the microbiome, help the body digest their food, also produce vitamins, prevent digestive tract infections, and also control the immune system. Now the research is showing that a healthy balance of these microbes is essential for maintaining good health. So, when the balance of the microbiome gets upset, it is called dysbiosis. Researchers now think that its dysbiosis that may be the trigger for both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This would mean that by preventing dysbiosis it could be possible to control Inflammatory Bowel Disease IBD, known to affect more than a million Americans.

The Journal Genome Medicine published a review of microbiome research in 2013. They found the human microbiome to be an important in the lifelong role of maintaining health. The bacteria in the microbiome have been closely linked to a lot of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, including IBD. Now the next step is to profiling the microbiome through the study of microbial genes so that we may look towards new kinds of treatment. The Probiotic Symposium that I attended in San Antonio, Texas in November of 2013, also provided new research in this field.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science sponsored a symposium on the microbiome in 2012. The researches spoke about the discovery of the 4 million or more genes in the microbiome and predicted that this research may lead to a revolution in treatment of infections, malnutrition, diabetes, obesity, as well as Inflammatory Bowel Disease  IBD. The big leap i.e. the ability to do gene sequencing for all the different bacteria in the microbiome rather than the old inefficient way they had to learn about it was by doing bacterial cultures.

Sultan says that the current thinking is that people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease IBD inherit genes that predispose them to the disease but not everybody with the genes gets the disease. It’s something in the environment that has to trigger the genes to cause disease. More and more its pointing to bacteria in the microbiome that are a major trigger.

Many studies have shown that people with IBD tend to have dysbiosis, having less of the friendly bacteria and more types of bacteria that cause gut inflammation. But what comes first, the chicken or the egg. Does IBD cause the dysbiosis that leads to gut inflammation or does dysbiosis trigger Inflammatory Bowel Disease IBD? This is still the one of the big question that remains to be answered. My sense is that both conditions exist. I think that its not a matter of either/or, but both possibilities, sometimes the IBD will trigger the dysbiosis and other times the dysbiosis will lead to IBD. I look forward to watching as the research conclusions develop.

I attended a dinner sponsored by the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America a few weeks ago. I learned about the research they are sponsoring to help understand the role the microbiome plays in IBD. It’s called the Microbiome Initiative. They started in 2008. The researchers have already completed the collection of DNA data from the microbiomes of people without IBD and now they are collecting data from the microbiomes of people that do have IBD. They are looking to identify the changes in the microbiome that occur during IBD flare ups and also when they are in remission.

“The dream scenario would be that we discover which bacteria trigger IBD and eliminate them,” he says. “That could cure IBD.” But he says that a more complicated relationship is more likely. “The links between the microbiome and IBD are probably part of the puzzle,” he says. “What we learn may allow us to customize treatment for each patient with IBD based on their own genes and the genes of their microbiome.”

We already know that people may inherit 169 genes that can predispose them to having IBD. And it’s also known that bacteria inside the digestive tracts of people with IBD are different from bacteria of people without IBD. Now we will rely on the experts to start ‘putting the puzzle together’, he says. He knows that there is a lot of time and money being spent on profiling the microbiome. His opinion is that there is too much going on for there not to be some big breakthroughs in the near future.

Probiotics Symposium Day 2 – San Antonio TX

Russell Jaffe MDRussell Jaffe MD, Ph D, CCN, Fellow of Health Studies Collegium, was the first presenter today. He had lots and lots of valuable information to share with us. He focused on the importance of what he referred to as ‘qualified predictive biomarkers’ that help us to understand each person’s condition and what needs to be considered when advising treatment.

These are the ‘qualified predictive biomarkers’  that he recommends. The tests are freely available and any physician can order them. If you’re interested in doing so,  just make a note of them and take the list to your favorite physician for the tests to be run and interpreted for you:

  • Hgb A1c evaluation, This parameter reinforces life style choice as being very important and not only genetics.
  • homocysteine is used to evaluate sulphur cycles. He stressed the importance of having enough sulphur foods in your diet , like garlic, ginger, onion, broccoli sprouts, and eggs.
  • hsCRP evaluates the level of inflammation in your body,
  • Oxidized LDL/HDL and 8 oxo-guanine evaluates free radical risk,
  • Vitamin D ensures cell adhesion
  • 1st am urine pH to evaluate acidosis risk
  • LRA by ELISA/ACT tolerance and hypersenstivity test.He says by getting the results from these tested, collectively, you can have a very good idea of how ‘healthy’ a person is, and can anticipate whether they have a chance of living for another 10 or 20 years.

Stig Bengmark MDI loved the quote that Stig Bengmark from Sweden included in his presentation: “We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons.” He reinforced my belief that underlying persistent inflammation is the mother of all disease. He explained how stressors can turn genes on and off, modify histones and even seem to affect what gets passed down to our offspring.

He sees a relationship between malfunctioning microbiota and dysbiosis where the two go hand in hand. When microbiota are stable they reduce general inflammation and maintain immune homeostasis. When they’re not stable, that’s when we start getting problems. He also said that processed foods can be responsible for encouraging dysbiosis, leaky gut and a malfunctioning immune response.

He spoke about the importance of eating magnesium rich foods, tumeric, and fermented foods. He loves avocados and made the comment that he would suggest mothers feed their infants avocados rather than formula!

Charalabos Pothoulakis MDCharalabos Pothoulakis MD from the Division of Digestive Disease at UCLA gave an in depth talk on what we know currently about saccharomyces boulardii and c difficile, the leading cause of healthcare-infectious diarrhea in the US. He has been involved in studies on saccharomyces boulardii  and they have shown how helpful this friendly strain of yeast has been in the prevention and treatment of diarrhea that has been caused by antibiotics and also c difficile. Another study he spoke about was conducted on Crohn’s patients. They found that  S. boulardii added to baseline therapy reduced leaky gut and improved intestinal permeability in these patients. (Gracia Vilela et al 2008,43(7):842-8)

Michael Cabana MDMichael Cabana MD from UCSF told us about the use of probiotics with pediatric allergies and asthma patients. He wasn’t able to site any conclusive evidence as some studies showed positive outcomes while others didn’t – it may have to do with patient compliance, he said, and will need to be studied further. He did say that they have found the probiotic,  l. reuteri to be used effectively for colic.

There were questions from the audience with regard to FMT – Fecal Microbial Transplants. Dr Cabana told us that presently the procedure was conducted in Seattle, Washington and Canada. He was hopeful that it would be used more extensively in the future, in the US, as there was a CPT code assigned to the procedure!

Probiotics Symposium Attendees

Copyright © 2017 Good Gut Solution.

Sheryl Cohen February 14, 2017