How To Get the Most Out Of Your At Home Gut Test.

A yearly gut test is a really good idea if you want to know things about what resides in your gut. Your gut health is the most essential component to disease prevention and longevity.

What's in your gut?Your immune system lives in your gut, and most importantly your body’s ability to produce hormones is affected by your gut. Essentially you need to make sure it’s running properly before you have any symptoms. That’s why a yearly gut test ought to be done as a check up. 

A great test to take for yearly maintenance is the Doctors Data Comprehensive Stool Analysis Test.  or Genova Labs’ Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis.

Maybe you have constipation, gas, bloating, brain fog, diarrhea or chronic stomach pain. This could be due to a bacteria, yeast or a fungal overgrowth, or maybe even a parasite that you picked up on your travels. A gut test will also indicate that you may have a bacteria imbalance and need more good bacteria. We suggest Genova Comprehensive Parasitology or Doctors Data Comprehensive Parasitology Test. Both companies offer similar labs.

If you’ve already had a gut test and found your good bacteria levels to be low you may have started taking prebiotics and probiotics. If it’s been at least three months since you’ve been taking them, now is a good time to recheck.

You want to make sure that your probiotics are working to bring in more good bacteria and it’s actually taking up residency in your gut. A gut recheck ought to be a way to ensure that you’re taking the right probiotic for you and also let you know if you need prebiotic fiber to fertilize the probiotic.

If your previous assessment results have shown that you have candida, and you followed a protocol and change of diet, you can retest to make sure the protocol has worked and the candida is under control.  At this point you will know if you should continue with the protocol.

Do you know that there is a specific parasite test? There’s a great one from Genova Diagnostics. 

If you tested positive for parasites you most likely followed a protocol to cleanse the digestive tract and then recolonized your gut and strengthened your immune system. Once the treatment protocol is finished you need to retest to ensure the parasites are gone.   

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Does Everyone Need Spore Based Probiotics

Microbiome Information from Kiran Krishnan

We sat down with Kiran Krishnan, microbiologist and microbiome researcher. We asked him the question, “Does everybody need to take a spore based probiotic?”   

A lot of people will say, “You know what? I don’t really have any particular digestive issues. Do I really need to take this product?”

If you eat a very clean diet, you may be thinking the same thing. You may feel feel that you get everything you need from the nutrients you eat in fruits and vegetables. 

Kiran’s research shows that often we do not get the bacteria we need in our diet.  If you were living off the land, if you lived on the side of a mountain, you grew your own food, you forage the roots of tubers, you definitely don’t need them. However, if you live in a city or you live in a modern house or apartment building, you’re going to need them. If you buy your foods in the grocery store, you’re going to need them. 

If you look at the course of human evolution, you will see that we naturally were exposed to these types of bacteria.  Our hunter, gather, foraging ancestors who ate and lived off the land got huge doses of these particular bacteria on a daily basis every time they ate or drank from their environment. That’s why these bacteria have developed this long-term symbiotic relationship with the body.

Our ancestors maintained their good but bacteria naturally for millions of years. The problem is we don’t get them in our food anymore. Our food supply has changed along with how we obtain our food and how we eat it.

How Do We Benefit From the Bacteria Once They Are Established in our Gut?

They create a protective barrier for the body from the outside world

They detoxify the gut

They improve the growth of good bacteria

They suppress the bad bacteria

They train the immune system 

All of these things are necessary on a daily basis because the modern lifestyle that we live is very much an assault to our system.

What Destroys Our Microbiome?

GMOs that we’re exposed to in our food

Chemicals in our household and our personal care products

Antibiotics

Toxic chemicals in our drinking water

All those things target and affect the gut in a negative way on a daily basis. We need these spores in there to reverse that damage which we’re doing every day. We need them as a protective system within the gut itself.

Kiran Krishnan, gut bacteria, human microbiomeClick here to listen to our interview with Kiran on You tube. Check out our 6 Part Series on the Microbiome with Kiran Krishnan. You can find out the latest findings from their new human clinical trials.

 

Microbiome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease IBD

Human Microbiome for IBD treatment
Courtesy of : ondineblog.com

There’s a lot of recent talk about something called the human microbiome. I read a very interesting article by Chris Iliades, MD that was reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi. They say that the human microbiome has now become one of the most researched medical subject. Those of us who have been advocating use of probiotics for years and years now, have been well aware of the importance of probiotics and microbiota to a healthy digestive tract. Finally, allopatic medical research is catching up, and their findings could lead to a revolution in human health. For those suffering with crohns and colitis, i.e. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), this microbiome research could hold the key to future successful treatment and even prevention.

Keith Sultan, MD, assistant professor at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine and gastroenterologist at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. tells us that the human microbiome is all the microbes that normally live inside the human digestive system and he says that for doctors who treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the big interest is in bacteria that live inside the colon and small intestine. He thinks that these bacteria may be the key to controlling the condition (IBD).

He goes on to explain how everyone has zillions of microbes living inside their digestive tract. These microbes, collectively known as the microbiome, help the body digest their food, also produce vitamins, prevent digestive tract infections, and also control the immune system. Now the research is showing that a healthy balance of these microbes is essential for maintaining good health. So, when the balance of the microbiome gets upset, it is called dysbiosis. Researchers now think that its dysbiosis that may be the trigger for both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This would mean that by preventing dysbiosis it could be possible to control Inflammatory Bowel Disease IBD, known to affect more than a million Americans.

The Journal Genome Medicine published a review of microbiome research in 2013. They found the human microbiome to be an important in the lifelong role of maintaining health. The bacteria in the microbiome have been closely linked to a lot of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, including IBD. Now the next step is to profiling the microbiome through the study of microbial genes so that we may look towards new kinds of treatment. The Probiotic Symposium that I attended in San Antonio, Texas in November of 2013, also provided new research in this field.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science sponsored a symposium on the microbiome in 2012. The researches spoke about the discovery of the 4 million or more genes in the microbiome and predicted that this research may lead to a revolution in treatment of infections, malnutrition, diabetes, obesity, as well as Inflammatory Bowel Disease  IBD. The big leap i.e. the ability to do gene sequencing for all the different bacteria in the microbiome rather than the old inefficient way they had to learn about it was by doing bacterial cultures.

Sultan says that the current thinking is that people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease IBD inherit genes that predispose them to the disease but not everybody with the genes gets the disease. It’s something in the environment that has to trigger the genes to cause disease. More and more its pointing to bacteria in the microbiome that are a major trigger.

Many studies have shown that people with IBD tend to have dysbiosis, having less of the friendly bacteria and more types of bacteria that cause gut inflammation. But what comes first, the chicken or the egg. Does IBD cause the dysbiosis that leads to gut inflammation or does dysbiosis trigger Inflammatory Bowel Disease IBD? This is still the one of the big question that remains to be answered. My sense is that both conditions exist. I think that its not a matter of either/or, but both possibilities, sometimes the IBD will trigger the dysbiosis and other times the dysbiosis will lead to IBD. I look forward to watching as the research conclusions develop.

I attended a dinner sponsored by the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America a few weeks ago. I learned about the research they are sponsoring to help understand the role the microbiome plays in IBD. It’s called the Microbiome Initiative. They started in 2008. The researchers have already completed the collection of DNA data from the microbiomes of people without IBD and now they are collecting data from the microbiomes of people that do have IBD. They are looking to identify the changes in the microbiome that occur during IBD flare ups and also when they are in remission.

“The dream scenario would be that we discover which bacteria trigger IBD and eliminate them,” he says. “That could cure IBD.” But he says that a more complicated relationship is more likely. “The links between the microbiome and IBD are probably part of the puzzle,” he says. “What we learn may allow us to customize treatment for each patient with IBD based on their own genes and the genes of their microbiome.”

We already know that people may inherit 169 genes that can predispose them to having IBD. And it’s also known that bacteria inside the digestive tracts of people with IBD are different from bacteria of people without IBD. Now we will rely on the experts to start ‘putting the puzzle together’, he says. He knows that there is a lot of time and money being spent on profiling the microbiome. His opinion is that there is too much going on for there not to be some big breakthroughs in the near future.