Probiotics for Quality of Life in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Visbiome Probiotic Research for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Ohio State University is sponsoring clinical trials to investigate the use of Visbiome Probiotics for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

We know that there is a close connections between the physical and mental/emotional health of people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Recently there is a lot of information on immune abnormalities and gut microbiome differences.

Genome interactions with them suggest a possible etiological link between physical and mental dysfunction, especially the gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction and severe anxiety that many of those with Autism Spectrum Disorders manifest.

There has been some clinical evidence to show that children with Autism Spectrum Disorder with GI symptoms have a different microbiome composition and function to neurotypical children with GI symptoms.

The investigators hypothesize that altered host-microbial signals, which include altered fecal neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels contribute to the anxiety and the heightened sensory responsivity in Autism Spectrum Disorder..

Initial observation show that Visbiome probiotic Extra Strength, improves Gastrointestinal and pain symptoms, which would correspond with an alteration in gut microbiome composition and related metabolites (the macrobiome).

This trial investigates the possibilities of this new appreciation of the microbiome-mental/physical function connection for Autism Spectrum Disorder, GI dysfunction, and anxiety.

A pilot trial with 12 children with ASD will test feasibility for a proposed three-site crossover randomized clinical trial (RCT) of probiotics (beneficial bacteria including Lactobacilli & Bifidobacteria) in 60 children 3-12 years old with Autism Spectrum Disorder, gut dysfunction, & anxiety.

The investigators have access to significant fecal microbiome and metabolome data from NIH-funded Human Microbiome Projects (HMP) on similar-age healthy and irritable-bowel children, with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder.

See more details about the study.