Dysbiosis in the Gut

Dysbiosis in the Gut

An imbalance in the flora (a dysbiosis) in anyone who complains of stomach troubles. Digestive difficulty of absolutely any kind suggests there’s something wrong with the trillions of microbes inside the gut. If you have stomach upset after eating, indigestion, the extremely common GERD (reflux), heartburn, slow digestion, or bloating, we think of dysbiosis.  If you have bowel problems, like excessive gas, lower belly pains, constipation, or diarrhea – then dysbiosis is our prime suspect too.

Dysbiosis as the Root Cause of Seemingly Unrelated Disorders

It surprises many patients that other symptoms, including those that on the surface seem to have nothing to do with the gut, also make me suspect dysbiosis.  We are becoming more and more aware the impact our microbiome has on our whole being – our whole health – and our disease processes.

When I see someone whose health concerns are not primarily digestive in nature – even those who report having a perfect digestive system – I usually investigate their microbiome, and will almost always prescribe a probiotic. Why? Because sometimes dysbiosis is silent gut-wise, while still causing trouble in other areas of your body.

Here are a few examples:

  • Hormonal imbalance – we know that certain bacteria encourage an imbalance in hormones.  
  • Autoimmune diseases show clear links to overgrowth of some bacteria.  
  • Joint aches and pains can be caused by leaky gut, which is usually a consequence of some kind of imbalance in the gastrointestinal microbiome.  
  • Neurological and psychiatric disease is being traced back to problems with our microbes.  
  • Weight loss resistance is often a consequence of over (or under) growth of the bacterial flora.  

Basically, any inflammatory process can be traced back to the gut.  

How do you know if you have dysbiosis?

How does your internal garden grow?  The tests we most often request are simple:  Stool, breath, and urine testing – all of which give us a picture of what your personal microbiome looks like.  We learn from the test results how many beneficial bacteria are growing, and how many malicious bacteria have taken up residence in your gut. We use that information to create your personalized treatment plan.

With some patients we assume dysbiosis without testing – and just get you started on the good stuff  – probiotics and healthy, fiber-rich foods.

Dr. Pamela Nathan Recommends:

1. Comprehensive Parasitology Profile - most technologically advanced procedures to accurately identify a wide range of protozoal parasites, including amoebae, flagellates, ciliates, coccidia and microsporidia

2. Perfect Pass ProBiotic and PreBiotic - Prebiotics & Probiotics together and improve the diversity of your good bacteria daily

3. OmegaZyme Ultra Digestive Enzymes - high-activity digestive enzyme formula with a broad spectrum of 21 digestive enzymes, supporting more complete digestion of food for gastrointestinal health, regularity and normal bowel function

4. Primal Defense Ultra high potency‚ broad-spectrum probiotic formula‚ providing a 15 billion live cell count per day of 13 species of beneficial cultures including soil-based probiotics called Homeostatic Soil Organisms

5. UltraInflamX Plus 360° - Advanced Support for the Nutritional Management of Compromised Gut Function in IBD

6. Prime One - a non-toxic, herbal formula that can deliver significant energy, superior vitality, and maximum strength

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