Probiotic Therapy-How to Get the Best Results

Watch Part 2 of our Microbiome series with Kiran Krishnan.

Kiran Krishnan, Microbiologist

We hope you are enjoying learning all the latest news on the Microbiome. We have another informative video for you this week. Just in time for the holiday weekend where we may be tempted to have that extra hot dog or slice of apple pie.

In case you missed our last video, we will be posting regular you tube videos of our interviews with Microbiologist Kiran Krishnan who is the Chief Scientific Officer of Microbiome Labs.

Over the last 12 years Kiran has been focused on the study of the Human Microbiome.

Kiran is a frequent lecturer on the Human Microbiome at Medical and Nutrition Conferences worldwide. He is currently involved in 4 clinical trials on probiotics.

We asked Kiran about how taking multiple strains of probiotics increases the effectiveness.

 

When it comes to multiple strains, it’s good to diversify our gut flora.

Right?

While this is true, taking a probiotic with 15 different strains that can’t penetrate through the stomach acids in your gut and immediately die off is not going to have a very positive or prolonged effect.

There are certain strains which have a better result in effecting your gut and creating positive change. One such strain is the Bacillus Endospore.

Why is the Bacillus Endospore Strain One of the Best Universally?

  • Acts as the ‘police’ of your gut
  • Gets rid of your bad bacteria and fungus
  • Fixes damage to the intestinal lining of your gut, which leads to Leaky Gut
  • Increase your metabolic function
  • Improves your immune function
  • Regulates balance of intestinal flora
  • Enhances growth of your good bacteria

Should you take more probiotic strains and a higher dose to create more profound change in the gut?

Listen to Kiran’s answer to this question by clicking below.

Stay tuned for Part 3 of the Microbiome Series with Good Gut Solution & Kiran Krishnan coming in two weeks.

 

Probiotics-Therapy for Overall Health

Good Gut Solution interviewed Kiran Krishnan this week on all the latest research and findings on the Microbiome.

Kiran Krishnan, Microbiologist

Kiran Krishnan is a Microbiologist & Chief Scientific Officer of Microbiome Labs. Kiran is a frequent lecturer on the Human Microbiome at Medical and Nutrition Conferences worldwide. He is currently involved in 4 clinical trials on probiotics and how they relate to overall health.

Over the last 12 years Kiran has been focused on the study of the Human Microbiome.

I was grateful to have the chance to talk with Kiran about his latest research and ask him some important questions about his current understanding of the microbiome.

We have a lot of new information that we’ll be sharing  with you over the next coming weeks.

What are the newest findings on the Human Microbiome?

As you know, there are trillions of bacteria living in your gut.  Most of these trillion microorganisms have been there practically from the day you were born. What you may not know, however, is exactly how they have a profound effect on your health.

When your gut is out of order, it is a primary cause of many non-infectious diseases such as autoimmunity, allergies, asthma, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. ​​​​​​​

  • 100 trillion microorganisms occupy your gut
  • 99% of reactions for human function are controlled by your gut. 
  • 80% of your immune tissue is found in the gastrointestinal tract.

Overwhelming scientific evidence illustrates the critical role these microbes play in both the function and dysfunction of the immune system and overall well being.

We asked Kiran why probiotics are such an important therapy for overall health. Here’s what he had to say.

Watch Now

 

 

Fermentation – It’s Good For the Gut

Fermented foods are all the rage these days. Just go to any farmer’s market and you’ll find at a least a few vendors selling fermented vegetables, pickled kimchi’s, kombucha and gut ciders.

How do these fermented foods help improve your gut health?

It helps to think of the process used to create fermented foods as the same process your gut uses to digest foods. Think of your digestion as your internal fermentation system.

Historically the fermentation process was used as a method to preserve foods. It’s history goes back thousands of years and across many cultures.  The fermentation process works by producing short chain fatty-acids which prohibit harmful bacteria from growing.

At the same time these short-chain fatty acids produce the ideal pH to encourage good bacteria to grow.

This is the reason adding fermented foods and probiotics to your diet is a great way to improve the environment in your gut.

One probiotic on the market, Dr. Ohhira’s Professional Formula, takes this fermentation process a step further by feeding their 12 strains of bacteria for five years.

We talked with Ross Pelton, the scientist for Dr. Ohhira’s probiotics, about the fermentation process and how it works in our digestive system.

 

He says that the first step in changing your ‘pathobiome’ (unhealthy microbiome) into a healthy microbiome is to change the environment.

You need to replace the environment by changing the acid balance so it’s no longer favorable to bad bacteria.

Listen to more of Dr. Ross Pelton’s interviews on the microbiome by clicking here.

Stay tuned for our next segment in a few weeks.

 

Ross Pelton’s Video Series on the Human Microbiome & Dr. Ohhira’s Probiotics

Good Gut Solution Health Corner

Culinary Expert and Health Coach, Sheryl Cohen interviews doctors, authors,

nutritionists, wellness experts, and other prominent leaders in the probiotics

and natural health arena.

The Human Microbiome & Dr. Ohhira’s Probiotic Formulas

We are excited to share our Microbiome Series with you where we interview Ross Pelton, the Scientific Director for Essential Formulas. He is a Health Longevity Coach, pharmacist and clinical nutritionist.

Ross is a true expert on pharmaceutical drugs and their life-altering side effects. He helps his clients integrate the best of both worlds to achieve improvement in their health.

In addition, Ross  is also a clinical nutritionist and helps people with diet, nutrition and natural therapies. He truly is an expert in his field.

He is  an author of 6 books on multiple health subjects focusing on the topic of drug-induced nutrient depletions.

He shares with us exciting new information on gut health, the Microbiome and the Pathobiome.

If you want to change your Microbiome these videos will explain how you can create and maintain a healthy Microbiome.

What is the Human Microbiome Project?

Microbiome Dysbiosis

Dr. Ohhira’s Probiotics-The Multi-Strain Formula and why they are so special

How Does Fermentation Affect our Gut and How is it Related to Probiotics

 

5 Ways to Kick Late Night Eating Habits

How to Kick Late Night Eating Habits

Late Night Snacking

In an article by Ellie Krieger in the Union Tribune, San Diego, CA on March 14, 2017 she tells us that in January five Washington Post staffers embarked on a 30 day diet challenge & wrote about their experiences on a weekly basis.

Ellie had the role of interviewing each of them so she could lend her perspective as a nutritionist. She tells us that one clear pattern emerged right from the start.
i.e. most of the staffers said they struggled with nighttime eating.

Yes, according to a new scientific statement by the American Heart Association published in the Journal Circulation, very few of us eat the standard three meals a day anymore. What happens now is that we skip meals  – apparently 20-30% of U.S. adults don’t eat breakfast, snacking more often and eat around the clock.

The downside of late night eating go beyond our choice of food at that time, which is often ultra processed sugar and/or salt laden foods that we tend to munch on after dinner, while watching TV, a movie, playing with the kids or just hanging out. Actually the time that we’re eating, is also a major issue.

Fortunately, the staffers on the 30 day diet challenge realized that they had the ability to change the late night eating habit. Here’s 5 ways they used to reset their eating patterns, with some additional tips from Ellie.

1.Eat regular meals
Not eating enough during the day can set the stage for nighttime binging. Flip this pattern and give yourself a fighting chance for success after sundown by eating regular meals & snacks throughout the day. Plan meals ahead of time.

2.Pick a cut off time
About 8 or 9 pm works for most people, but you can choose whatever time is best for you. Ideally. it ought be about 3 hours before bedtime, giving you enough time to digest your dinner, but not so long that you are likely to get hungry again before going to sleep.

3.Wait and re-evaluate
If you are craving food at night, instead of impulsively raiding the fridge, take a 15 minute pause. Check in with how you are feeling & ask yourself whether you are really hungry or whether perhaps there is another way to find satisfaction.A relaxing bath, brisk walk or cup of tea may be a good substitute and do the trick.

4.Plan an evening snack
If you tend to eat dinner early, or your evening meal is on the light side and you regularly find yourself hungry at night, plan a small healthy snack to eat between dinner and bedtime. Maybe some fruit & yogurt, a cup of soup or avocado toast. The idea is to strategically snack so that you manage your hunger rather than let your appetite leave you open to and more likely to randomly be munching.

5.Set some ground rules.
Its almost like a national pastime to be eating out of a bag or carton at the same time as sitting on the sofa watching TV but its a scene that creates a perfect storm. Try to stop doing that unconsciously.

You can do it!