Probiotic Spores Produce Antioxidants in the Gut

Antioxidants are produced in our gut by the Bacillus endosporeWhat’s the Role Probiotics Play in Producing Antioxidants?

We asked our friend, Kiran Krishnan, microbiologist and gut health expert, if probiotics produce antioxidants in the gut. We were curious about how probiotics can produce antioxidants, which ones are produced and how you can benefit from these amazing nutrients. Scroll to the bottom of this post to see our interview with Kiran on this fascinating topic.

Kiran has specialized in gut health for the past 17 years. He has gathered a wealth of knowledge on probiotics and how they affect our microbiome from his research and the latest clinical trials.

Here’s what Kiran had to say, “There’s only one type of probiotic strain that can produce antioxidants and that’s the strains of the Bacillus family.

It’s true the Bacillus endospore strains produce antioxidants in the gut.”

Here’s how they work; they take incoming food and convert them into antioxidants and other useful nutrients such as Methylated B Vitamins.

Lets take a look at the antioxidants produced in our gut with Bacillus Spores.

Ubiquinol

  • Supports optimal cardiovascular function
  • Boosts your energy and stamina levels over the long term
  • Supports optimal energy production in the mitochondria in all cells
  • Reduces the normal signs of aging by preventing damage caused by oxidative stress and free radicals
  • Enhances the support of your immune and nervous systems
  • Helps tissue cells generate energy and protect against damage from free radicals and oxidative stress

Quinone

  • Decreases inflammation and free radicals
  • Creates new mitochondria
  • Improves memory and reasoning
  • Neuroprotective against Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Cognitive Injuries
  • Improves sleep, mood, and fatigue
  • Improves immune health

Lycopene

  • Protects your body from toxic pesticides found in foods and chemicals such as MSG
  • Slows down several types of cancer
  • Protects your eyes from oxidative stress and cataract development
  • Boosts heart health
  • Relieves oxidative stress in the bones
  • Counteracts cell damage to the brain caused by aging

Vitamin K2

  • Reduces osteoporosis and deteriorating bones
  • Slows artery hardening
  • Inhibits growth of cancer

Beta Carotene

  • Boost your immune system protect your skin and eyes
  • Lowers chances of developing heart disease
  • Protects against cancer

Watch Kiran Krishnan’s video about antioxidants here.

Stay tuned for Part 4 of our Microbiome series with Kiran Krishnan. We will be asking Kiran about the role of probiotics for those with Autism.

Probiotic Therapy-How to Get the Best Results

Watch Part 2 of our Microbiome series with Kiran Krishnan.

Kiran Krishnan, Microbiologist

We hope you are enjoying learning all the latest news on the Microbiome. We have another informative video for you this week. Just in time for the holiday weekend where we may be tempted to have that extra hot dog or slice of apple pie.

In case you missed our last video, we will be posting regular you tube videos of our interviews with Microbiologist Kiran Krishnan who is the Chief Scientific Officer of Microbiome Labs.

Over the last 12 years Kiran has been focused on the study of the Human Microbiome.

Kiran is a frequent lecturer on the Human Microbiome at Medical and Nutrition Conferences worldwide. He is currently involved in 4 clinical trials on probiotics.

We asked Kiran about how taking multiple strains of probiotics increases the effectiveness.

 

When it comes to multiple strains, it’s good to diversify our gut flora.

Right?

While this is true, taking a probiotic with 15 different strains that can’t penetrate through the stomach acids in your gut and immediately die off is not going to have a very positive or prolonged effect.

There are certain strains which have a better result in effecting your gut and creating positive change. One such strain is the Bacillus Endospore.

Why is the Bacillus Endospore Strain One of the Best Universally?

  • Acts as the ‘police’ of your gut
  • Gets rid of your bad bacteria and fungus
  • Fixes damage to the intestinal lining of your gut, which leads to Leaky Gut
  • Increase your metabolic function
  • Improves your immune function
  • Regulates balance of intestinal flora
  • Enhances growth of your good bacteria

Should you take more probiotic strains and a higher dose to create more profound change in the gut?

Listen to Kiran’s answer to this question by clicking below.

Stay tuned for Part 3 of the Microbiome Series with Good Gut Solution & Kiran Krishnan coming in two weeks.

 

Lose Weight with Probiotics

Probiotics affect how we lose weight.

Lose Weight with Probiotics

Weight Management is a challenge for many of us. We try eating healthy, counting calories, working out with our fitbits, cleansing and dieting.  Sometimes, it seems like no matter how good a job we do to take care of ourselves and watch what we eat, we still have no results when it comes to weight loss. Who ever thought that gut bacteria influences how we lose weight.

New information tells us that we can lose weight when we pay attention to our gut bacteria.

It turns out that our gut bacteria and the types of species we have in our digestive tract play an important role in determining if we are going to be thin or fat. Yes, that’s right,  it’s the type of bacteria in our digestive system that is tied to obesity.

We also know now that they play an extremely important role in our risk for developing Type 2 diabetes as well.

How does our microbiome bacteria affect weight control?

  • Our unique bacteria can determine why some people can get away with eating unhealthy foods without weight gain while others need a near perfect diet in order to maintain an optimum weight.
  • The latest research is able to show that the type of bacteria we have in our digestive system controls the number of calories we take from foods we ingest and  even the types of food we crave.
  • The way our food is converted after eating is effected by our bacteria as well.
  • Some foods, particularly carbohydrates, may change to compounds that result in fat storage, gas and insulin resistance.
  • On the other hand, bacteria in our gut is able to convert the identical foods to compounds that actually increase fat burning, reduce gas, increase insulin sensitivity and help to keep us satisfied.
  • These effects are influenced by turning on critical genes in the gut that control our metabolism.
  • What this means is that we are either genetically programmed to gain weight easily or to be lean.

The good news is that this genetic programming can be modified by taking the right probiotic bacteria.

Even better, we can feed the good bacteria with the right kinds of nutrients to help make that change even more effective.

How do We Change the Genetic Programming of Our Metabolism?

There are two key factors to pay attention to:

Bacteria & Fiber

There are 2 particular abundant species that are called Bacteroidetes and the other is Firmicutes. The ratio of these 2 species, Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes in our gut plays an important role.  Research scientists have found that thin people all over the world,  and from many different cultures, tend to have a higher ratio of bacteroidetes to firmicutes.

When ratio of firmicutes to bacteroidetes is higher, this is connected to obesity, diabetes and inflammation.

To get these two bacteria types into a healthy ratio, there are a few easy diet changes that we can make to help achieve a desired balance.

Bacteroidetes love fiber. Eating foods that are high in fiber and low in sugar, (zero sugar is the best!) will support the growth of the good bacteroidetes bacteria.

Firmicutes love sugar and simple carbohydrates.  If we have an overgrowth of firmicutes, we’re likely to get sugar and carbohydrate cravings. These bacteria are so powerful that they send neurotransmitters to our brain which make us crave more sugar.  They do this to get us to feed on the nutrients they want.

We know now that processed simple carbohydrates and sugars feed firmicutes and may lead to metabolic syndrome and weight gain.

So start reading labels and watch your sugar intake.

These Minor changes can go a long way. 

Another word of advice it to shorten the window of time that we eat our meals and snacks. It’s effective to try to eat all our food within an 8-10 hour window. You see, the microbes in our gut have a cycle. If we stretch our meals out for too long a time period, it stops the the good microbial recycling from happening.

If we have a 12+ hour period of fasting each day this allows the for beneficial bacteria growth and supports the growth of bacteroidetes.

The Right Type of Probiotic

The second most important microbial technique is to get the right probiotic into our system with our meals.

This insures that the healthy fiber and protein that we are consuming is being converted to fat busting compounds and not gas. If we eat a lot of healthy high fiber foods but don’t have the healthy probiotics in our gut, we can end up with gas and bloating.

This is because the bad bacteria feed on the fiber as well. When the bad bacteria feeds on fiber it converts it into hydrogen and methane gas instead of fat busting compounds.

Our Perfect Pass Probiotics are the right type of probiotics. They are formulated with a unique choice of probiotic bacteria that are known to convert fibers in the diet to short chain fatty acids which are known as the ‘fat busters’.

This formula is made of endospore forming gut bacteria known as bacillus species.

Research has shown that these strains of bacillus species, particularly when taken with fiber, increase the production of short chain fatty acids by 40% and decrease gas production by 50% .

This is precisely the key type of change that we want when eating fiber rich foods together with bacillus strain probiotics.

No other probiotic strains have achieved this type of metabolic response to fiber so far.

Why Short Chain Fatty Acids are So Important.

SCFAs or short chain fatty acids literally control the entire metabolic process. They regulate the balance between making fat, burning fat, as well as breaking down and absorbing of fat from our diet.

Studies show that there is a direct effect from the increase of  SCFA’s that are formed by good bacteria and the way they stimulate burning of fat and reducing accumulation of fat.  Hence, it is the most direct evidence there is for how to change our metabolism.

Actually these changes happen at the genome level where the short chain fatty acids turn on fat burning genes and at the same time turn off fat storage genes. This is precisely what we want for permanent weight loss. We want to reprogram gene expression that controls how our bodies respond to food.

This is what we call epigenetics i.e. we are changing the gene expression of our metabolism. This is a much more permanent way to lose weight and keep it off without counting calories.

We can achieve this by taking these key strains of bacillus endospore probiotics that are found in Perfect Pass Probiotics, together with either following a diet that is rich in healthy fibers or simultaneously taking Perfect Pass Prebiotics made from PHGG.

Our bodies then become reprogrammed through the changes that occur with key genetic activation.  What happens? Fat burns and fat accumulation gets less. At the same time there is an increase in energy metabolism, caloric burn, insulin sensitivity and feelings of being satisfied by the food we eat.

In the short term, there are lots of diets out there, but, the way to permanent weight loss and true metabolic health is achieved with ‘Metabolic Reprogramming’ so that our bodies literally become well tuned fat burning engines.

Probiotics-Therapy for Overall Health

Good Gut Solution interviewed Kiran Krishnan this week on all the latest research and findings on the Microbiome.

Kiran Krishnan, Microbiologist

Kiran Krishnan is a Microbiologist & Chief Scientific Officer of Microbiome Labs. Kiran is a frequent lecturer on the Human Microbiome at Medical and Nutrition Conferences worldwide. He is currently involved in 4 clinical trials on probiotics and how they relate to overall health.

Over the last 12 years Kiran has been focused on the study of the Human Microbiome.

I was grateful to have the chance to talk with Kiran about his latest research and ask him some important questions about his current understanding of the microbiome.

We have a lot of new information that we’ll be sharing  with you over the next coming weeks.

What are the newest findings on the Human Microbiome?

As you know, there are trillions of bacteria living in your gut.  Most of these trillion microorganisms have been there practically from the day you were born. What you may not know, however, is exactly how they have a profound effect on your health.

When your gut is out of order, it is a primary cause of many non-infectious diseases such as autoimmunity, allergies, asthma, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. ​​​​​​​

  • 100 trillion microorganisms occupy your gut
  • 99% of reactions for human function are controlled by your gut. 
  • 80% of your immune tissue is found in the gastrointestinal tract.

Overwhelming scientific evidence illustrates the critical role these microbes play in both the function and dysfunction of the immune system and overall well being.

We asked Kiran why probiotics are such an important therapy for overall health. Here’s what he had to say.

Watch Now

 

 

Fermentation – It’s Good For the Gut

Fermented foods are all the rage these days. Just go to any farmer’s market and you’ll find at a least a few vendors selling fermented vegetables, pickled kimchi’s, kombucha and gut ciders.

How do these fermented foods help improve your gut health?

It helps to think of the process used to create fermented foods as the same process your gut uses to digest foods. Think of your digestion as your internal fermentation system.

Historically the fermentation process was used as a method to preserve foods. It’s history goes back thousands of years and across many cultures.  The fermentation process works by producing short chain fatty-acids which prohibit harmful bacteria from growing.

At the same time these short-chain fatty acids produce the ideal pH to encourage good bacteria to grow.

This is the reason adding fermented foods and probiotics to your diet is a great way to improve the environment in your gut.

One probiotic on the market, Dr. Ohhira’s Professional Formula, takes this fermentation process a step further by feeding their 12 strains of bacteria for five years.

We talked with Ross Pelton, the scientist for Dr. Ohhira’s probiotics, about the fermentation process and how it works in our digestive system.

 

He says that the first step in changing your ‘pathobiome’ (unhealthy microbiome) into a healthy microbiome is to change the environment.

You need to replace the environment by changing the acid balance so it’s no longer favorable to bad bacteria.

Listen to more of Dr. Ross Pelton’s interviews on the microbiome by clicking here.

Stay tuned for our next segment in a few weeks.