Dr. Pamela Nathan DHM L.Ac. has been delivering health to your front door since 1998. Happy patients in over 78 countries.

Free Shipping Over $69**

Shopping Cart

Your cart is currently empty.

What Can You Eat..When You Can’t Eat Anything?

What’s the Best Diet if you are Suffering with Crohn’s?

For many of the millions of people suffering with Crohn’s or Ulcerative Colitis this is a question that they ask themselves at every meal. Many sufferers are looking for a way to modify their diet to help reduce symptoms. Through trial and error and eliminating foods one at a time you slowly begin to figure out what works and what doesn’t work. The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation is hoping to shed some light on the subject.

The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation (CCFA) have implemented many new studies which will change our understanding of how diet can be altered to improve the quality life. What should you eat? Soon, we will have new treatment tools that incorporate diet modification.

One such study was launched last year by the Microbiome Initiative under CCFA. This study called FARMM, Food and Resulting Microbial Metabolites has set out to compare a Western diet, a vegan diet, and one formulated to treat Crohn’s disease in children. This research partnership between the CCFA and the Perlman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will be a powerful tool for nutritional therapy.

Volunteers in the study followed one of the randomly assigned diets for two weeks. Each individual was tracked by researchers to determine how their gut microbes were affected. “FARMM will advance our understanding of the complex relationship between our gut, and the small molecules they produce that end up circulating throughout our body,” explains Gary Wu, MD and Professor in Gastroenterology at the Perlman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The hope is to achieve a broader view of how a specific diet works to introduce remission in patients with Crohn’s disease.

Currently there is little information on how diet affects Crohn’s Disease. Most physicians and patients are very uncertain about what dietary changes to make. CCFA hopes to have critical new information within 3-5 years that can be used to educate healthcare providers and patients on how to use diet and nutrition to improve health, reduce symptoms and prevent malnutrition.

For more information on studies and clinical trials near you visit the CCFA website. 

Kathleen Baker Rises Up Against Crohn’s Disease to Win Silver at Olympics

Kathleen Baker defies Crohn's to Win at OlympicsKathleen Baker took second place to win a silver medal on Monday in the 100 meter backstroke. It was an incredible win for her since she has been battling Crohn’s disease.

Baker said she hoped her journey of coping with adversity would inspire others with Crohn’s. Kathleen was diagnosed with Crohn’s when she was just 13. For her to climb to the top and fulfill her dream of becoming an Olympic champion Baker had to battle fatigue, weight loss and chronic pain. This lifelong disease didn’t stop Kathleen but instead motivated her more and made her appreciate participating in the sport.

Read more about Kathleen’s climb to the top here.

Stay tuned as Kathleen Baker gets a shot at a gold medal later this week.

Former Soccer Star Raises Awareness for IBD

Brandi Chastain, IBD, IBDGamePlan.com

Brandi Chastain Raises Awareness for IBD

Brandi Chastain, former soccer star who played for the  United States women’s national soccer team from 1988 to 2004, is raising awareness for a new site called IBDGamePlan.com. The site is full of helpful tools and resources for living a normal life with IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease). The site has valuable information about Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, gastrointestinal specialists in your area and guidelines to help you manage your condition.

When Brandi Chastain is passionate about a cause she steps up to the plate to give back. Earlier this year the Concussion Legacy Foundation announced that Brandi Chastain,  will donate her brain to the foundation, whereupon it will be studied by researchers from the C.T.E. Center at Boston University, one of the foremost pioneers in the field.

It’s no surprise that when her son was diagnosed with Crohn’s last year, at the age of 9, that Brandi went above and beyond to raise awareness. “It’s crucial to have team support and a game plan” says Brandi. Read the full story here about the IBDGamePlan.com site launch. Brandi will be sharing her story through the site to raise awareness and provide helpful information and support.

 

Crohn’s Disease vs. IBS

Crohn’s disease affects more than half a million people in the United States, while anywhere from 10 to 15 percent of the population has irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The two conditions are very different, although they affect the same area of the body.

Crohn’s disease causes inflammation of the digestive system and can affect any area of the GI track, from the mouth to the anus, although it most often affects the end of the small intestine and the start of the colon. Crohn’s disease is included in a group of conditions collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease.

Symptoms of active Crohn’s disease include diarrhea, abdominal cramping, bloody stool, fever, and fatigue. Reduced appetite and weight loss are also symptoms of Crohn’s disease, which can only be diagnosed by a doctor. Research is mixed, but there may be a link between Crohn’s disease and later development of colorectal cancer.

Complications from Crohn’s disease may include ulcers on the walls of the intestine, holes in the bowel, abscess in the abdomen, pelvis or anal area, or even a narrowing of the intestine caused by scarring. Individuals with Crohn’s disease may not absorb nutrients properly.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, is not the same as irritable bowel disease, IBD, which is the category of conditions into which Crohn’s disease falls. IBS does not cause inflammation, but does involve a change in bowel function.

Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea or constipation, or some combination of the two. Many individuals can control IBS with medication and changes in diet. Stress and hormones may trigger episodes of IBS. This chronic condition does not increase one’s risk for colorectal cancer or cause changes in bowel tissue, unlike Crohn’s disease and related conditions.

Doctors can determine whether the symptoms one is experiencing are from IBS or Crohn’s disease and develop a treatment plan that helps a patient to control his or her symptoms.

Take it from a Doctor: Four Surprising Ways to Treat Crohn’s Disease

Surprising Ways to Treat Crohn's Disease

Living with Crohn’s disease or other inflammatory bowel diseases can be stressful. Add in work, doctor’s appointments, and not feeling well, and it’s a recipe for disaster.

When the body is stressed, blood is shunted away from your midsection and moves peripherally, to your arms and legs. This leads to decreased oxygenation of the gut and decreased metabolism. Stress also unleashes an army of hormones, which can lead to a flare in bowel symptoms. While you can’t eliminate all stress, you can change your habits to reduce its effects on a daily basis.

Here are four surprising ways to treat Crohns Disease by managing stress:

 

Continue reading

Copyright © 2017 Good Gut Solution.

Sheryl Cohen October 14, 2016